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Victoria in Victoria County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

William Robert Smith

(July 20, 1888 - July 20, 1952)

 
 
William Robert Smith Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, February 21, 2022
1. William Robert Smith Marker
Inscription.  Served in Co. D, Texas Rangers (1927-1933), under Captains W.W. Sterling, Will Wright, and Albert Mace. Hazardous duties included patrolling the Rio Grande for smugglers, protecting a prisoner from a Sherman lynch mob, dipping cattle for tick fever under death threat in Brazoria County, and investigating "Hot Oil" scandals at Kilgore. Deputy Sheriff of Cameron County (1933-1940), Police - Lieutenant in Brownsville (1940 1946). An effective lawman.
Recorded-1972

 
Erected 1972 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 6567.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Law Enforcement.
 
Location. 28° 48.871′ N, 97° 0.34′ W. Marker is in Victoria, Texas, in Victoria County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of North Main Street (U.S. 87) and West Red River Street. The marker is located in the northeastern section of the Memorial Park Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2201 N Main Street, Victoria TX 77901, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
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of this marker. John Howland Wood (approx. 0.2 miles away); Evergreen Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away); Victor Marion Rose (approx. 0.3 miles away); Agapito De Leon (approx. 0.3 miles away); Felix de Leon (approx. 0.3 miles away); Silvestre de Leon (approx. 0.3 miles away); Don Martin de León (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fernando de Leon (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Victoria.
 
Also see . . .  Hot Oil.
Production of petroleum in violation of state or federal regulations or in excess of quotas became a serious problem, particularly in Texas, as soon as attempts were made to stem the overproduction and consequent price decline that followed the development of the vast East Texas oilfield, discovered in October 1930. Adoption of a proration plan by the principal oil states in 1931 caused such a frantic rush of drilling that the governors declared martial law in the Oklahoma and East Texas fields and sent national guardsmen to shut down the wells. To evade the state proration laws and the federal regulation of interstate oil transportation imposed under the National Recovery Act, many independent producers resorted to trickery to increase their output. Their methods included tapping underground pipes or reservoirs, loading trucks by
The William Robert Smith Marker with the Ranger’s Prayer image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, February 21, 2022
2. The William Robert Smith Marker with the Ranger’s Prayer
moonlight, disguising oil trucks as moving vans, piping oil to moonshine refineries, and using dummy refineries that shipped oil labeled as gasoline. Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on February 26, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The William Robert Smith Gravestone and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, February 21, 2022
3. The William Robert Smith Gravestone and Marker
The view of the William Robert Smith Marker in the cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, February 21, 2022
4. The view of the William Robert Smith Marker in the cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 26, 2022. It was originally submitted on February 26, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 125 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 26, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Apr. 20, 2024