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Fredericksburg in Gillespie County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Morale

Admiral Chester Nimitz

 
 
Morale Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, December 2, 2021
1. Morale Marker
Inscription.  After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Nimitz took command of the Pacific Fleet aboard the submarine USS Grayling then met with his staff. Morale was low and the staff expected to be blamed for the disaster and then relieved.

Nimitz stunned them all by saying he had complete and unlimited confidence in every one of them and that he did not blame them for what had happened at Pearl Harbor. He wanted them all to remain. One of those present said it was like opening a window in a stuffy room.

Respect for the Enemy
Upon notification that the Japanese had accepted the surrender terms, Nimitz sent out a message to the forces under his command.

"With the termination of hostilities against Japan, it is incumbent on all officers to conduct themselves with dignity and decorum in their treatment of the Japanese and their public utterances in connection with the Japanese. ... the use of insulting epithets in connection with the Japanese as a race or as individuals does not now become the officers of the United States Navy."

During the initial phase of the occupation of Japan, Nimitz visited
Morale Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, December 2, 2021
2. Morale Marker
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the shrine of Admiral Togo and his former flagship, the battleship Mikasa.

Nimitz ordered guards placed at the Mikasa to prevent any looting of this historic ship. He also led the later effort to restore the ship, a symbol of Japanese naval heritage.

For more on Nimitz's regard for Admiral Togo and his postwar work on reconciliation visit the Japanese Garden of Peace.
 
Erected by Admiral Nimitz Gallery - National Museum of the War in the Pacific.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, World II.
 
Location. 30° 16.328′ N, 98° 52.049′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Texas, in Gillespie County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of East Main Street and North Washington Street. The marker is located northwest of the Admiral Nimitz Gallery which is a part of the National Museum of the Pacific War. There is an entrance fee to visit inside the museum but this marker is located on the outside grounds by the gift store. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 340 East Main Street, Fredericksburg TX 78624, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Legacy (here, next to this marker); Command Judgment (here, next to this marker); Selflessness (here, next to this marker); Dedicated to all Those Who Served 3rd Marine Division during WWII
The Morale Marker is the marker on the right of the four markers image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, December 2, 2021
3. The Morale Marker is the marker on the right of the four markers
(here, next to this marker); "Mahler Triplets" (here, next to this marker); No Fear of Hard Study (a few steps from this marker); Early Life in Fredericksburg (a few steps from this marker); Robert Elwood DeHart (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Also see . . .  Admiral Chester W. Nimitz. National Museum of the Pacific War (Submitted on May 1, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 3, 2022. It was originally submitted on April 29, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 89 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 1, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Mar. 28, 2023