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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

India House / British Memorial Garden in Hanover Square

Exploring Downtown

 
 
India House / British Memorial Garden in Hanover Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
1. India House / British Memorial Garden in Hanover Square Marker
Inscription.  
India House
The handsome brownstone building facing Hanover Square, built in 1853, originally housed the Hanover Bank – making this a rare surviving bank building from pre-Civil War New York. Like so many banks, it was inspired by Italian Renaissance palaces – appropriately enough, since many such palaces had themselves been built for powerful Italian banking families. The building’s varied history includes service as New York’s Cotton Exchange and the offices of W.R. Grace and Company. Since 1914, it has been home to India House, a private club founded by shipping executive James A. Farrell and newspaperman Willard Straight. The club’s early members – businessmen engaged in foreign trade – chose the name “India House” to suggest the romance of exotic ports.

Hanover Square
Hanover Square’s history as a public space dates back to the first years of the Dutch settlement. Named later for the British monarchy – the Hanoverians being the family of King George the Third, as well as the ancestors of the current Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles – Hanover Square is one of
Marker in Lower Manhattan image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
2. Marker in Lower Manhattan
The India House can be seen in the photo across the street from the marker.
the very few such royal place names in New York not dropped after the Revolution.

British Memorial Garden
Hanover Square has been transformed into the British Memorial Garden, a gift from the British community and its American friends to the people of New York City. The garden, designed by British landscape architects Julian and Isabel Bannerman, overflows with symbols, materials and plantings typical of the United Kingdom – from Scottish stone and Welsh slate, to City of London bollards, to an outline map of the British counties. Yew trees trimmed into abstract patterns offer a contemporary take on the traditional British topiary. The garden honors the memory of 67 British victims of the World Trade Center attacks, while also offering a place for the British community to gather for special events. British artist Anish Kapoor’s black granite sculpture Unity – symbolizing the unity between the United States and the United Kingdom – includes a light-reflecting chamber suggesting an eternal flame.
 
Erected by The Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Buildings.
 
Location. 40° 42.274′ N, 74° 0.556′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New
India House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
3. India House
Captain William B. Kidd lived nearby and often visited this house. Although Kidd was executed after being convicted of piracy in England, there are those who believe he was an innocent scapegoat in a political trial.
York County. Marker is at the intersection of Hanover Square and Pearl Street, on the right when traveling west on Hanover Square. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: One Hanover Square, New York NY 10004, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Queen Elizabeth II September 11th Garden (a few steps from this marker); The Cotton Exchange (within shouting distance of this marker); First Precinct Police Station (within shouting distance of this marker); 57 Stone Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Delmonico's Building (about 300 feet away); First Printing Press in the Colony of New York (about 300 feet away); 13 South William Street (about 300 feet away); Dutch Hoog Straat (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. A photograph of India House appears on the top right side of the marker. The marker’s lower left contains a photograph of Prince Charles with the caption “The British Memorial Garden is under the royal patronage of His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, who, with his wife Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall, visited the Garden on November 1, 2005, and laid the center stone for the garden pavement. Carved into the stone is the heraldic emblem of three feathers with the motto ‘Ich Dien’ (‘I serve’) a symbol of the Prince of Wales since the 14th century.”
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take a tour of the markers in lower Manhattan erected by the Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Also see . . .  The 1854 India House -- No. 1 Hanover Square. "Daytonian in Manhattan" entry. (Submitted on April 10, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
India House earlier version (2000) image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 2000
4. India House earlier version (2000)
The original "Heritage Trail" marker also encompassed Hanover Square and 100 Old Slip.
Abraham De Peyster statue in Hanover Square, May 1999 image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 1999
5. Abraham De Peyster statue in Hanover Square, May 1999
This statue was removed from Hanover Square during the construction of The British Memorial (later Queen Elizabeth II September 11th) Garden.
Replacement "Exploring Lower Manhattan" marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 20, 2013
6. Replacement "Exploring Lower Manhattan" marker
Installed after the garden became "The Queen Elizabeth II September 11th Garden".
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 10, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,330 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on December 13, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   6. submitted on December 14, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.
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Jun. 3, 2020