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Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Mills Mill

 
 
Mills Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, May 14, 2022
1. Mills Mill Marker
Inscription.  Under the entrepreneurial leadership of Otis Prentiss Mills and his son-in-law Walter Moore, the Mills Manufacturing Company was chartered in July, 1896. Utilizing part of the land he had purchased during the 1870s, that ran from Augusta Street south beyond Brushy Creek, and bounded by present-day Otis Street and Mill Avenue, O.P. Mills opened his 5,000 spindle mill and village in the spring of 1897. 200 people came to live in the village and work in the Romanesque style mill. 1902 saw the construction of a company store / YMCA / auditorium / gym. In 1903, over 1,000 people lived in 120 houses. 450 employees operated 27,000 spindles producing fine twills, cotton sheeting, and satins. By 1907, a small school was built with two paid teachers for 70 students under twelve. A “Union” church for Baptists and Methodist congregations was built for the rotating Sunday services. 1920’s villages enjoyed a large baseball park, tennis courts, a playground, croquet grounds, and “The Most Progressive Grammar School” in the state. In 1933 Emmanuel Baptist Church was built on Deering Street next to the Southern Railway spur. Methodists continued to meet at
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the Union church. In 1918 Alan Graham, former president of Vardry Mill, bought the mill and sold it in 1920 to the Reeves Brothers Company of Spartanburg who operated the mill until its closing.

With the founding and great growth of Tremont Avenue Church of God in 1919, the Southern Franklin Processing Company…Packaged Yarn Dyers in 1922, and Franklin Baptist Church in 1927, the village, housing 1,600 people living in 215 houses, expanded west to Green Avenue and the Southern Railway. However, by 1978, the mill, employing only 136 people closed. Today it houses The Lofts at Mills.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce. In addition, it is included in the Greenville Textile Heritage series list. A significant historical month for this entry is July 1896.
 
Location. 34° 52.059′ N, 82° 25.631′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is on Ravenel Street west of Smythe Street, on the right when traveling west. Marker located in Greenville Textile Heritage Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Greenville SC 29611, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Monaghan (here, next to this marker); Piedmont (a few steps from this marker); Brandon Mill (a few steps from this marker); Poe Mill (within shouting distance of this
Mills Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, May 14, 2022
2. Mills Mill Marker
marker); Poinsett (within shouting distance of this marker); Dunean (within shouting distance of this marker); Slater (within shouting distance of this marker); Parker High School (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenville.
 
Also see . . .  Greenville Textile Heritage Park. (Submitted on May 30, 2022.)
 
Mills Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, May 14, 2022
3. Mills Mill Marker
Marker on far right.
Greenville Textile Heritage Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, May 14, 2022
4. Greenville Textile Heritage Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 30, 2022. It was originally submitted on May 29, 2022, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 620 times since then and 82 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 29, 2022, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 21, 2024