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Stockton in San Joaquin County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Charles Weber and the Founding of Stockton

Weber Point

 
 
Charles Weber and the Founding of Stockton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Syd Whittle, November 1, 2009
1. Charles Weber and the Founding of Stockton Marker
Inscription.  
Arriving in California with the Bidwell Party in 1841, Charles Weber could not have anticipated the monumental changes that were to come to this region after the Gold Rush. Originally a native of Germany, Weber was an immigrant to California when it was governed by Mexico. In 1842, he went into business in San Jose with William Gulnac, a Mexican citizen. In 1845, after Weber himself became a Mexican citizen, he acquired Gulnac’s interest in a 48,747 acre Spanish land grant called “El Rancho del Campo de los Franceses,” a vast tract which included the future city of Stockton.

In 1847, Captain Weber had the village site surveyed and turned his full attention to settling the land and enticing settlers with free parcels. A few months later, in January, 1848, James Marshall discovered gold and initiated the California Gold Rush. Stockton, being the head of navigable waterways leading to the ocean, was uniquely positioned to grow into a thriving metropolis serving as California’s gateway to the southern mines.

In 1847, Weber established his residence on the peninsula that is now named Weber Point. He became a wealthy
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man, having reaped Gold Rush profits from his mining company and businesses. He built a magnificent home of redwood, adobe and brick on Weber Point which soon became a showplace among California homes. Gardens were planted around the home, and avidly nurtured by the Captain. This garden was open to the public for many years. Weber lived out the rest of his years in his mansion with his wife Helen. He was survived by their three children, Charles, Julia and Thomas. You can find more information on Charles Weber and view the footprint of his mansion if you visit the pavilion on the far western edge of Weber Point.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical month for this entry is January 1848.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed. It was located near 37° 57.203′ N, 121° 17.615′ W. Marker was in Stockton, California, in San Joaquin County. Marker could be reached from West Weber Avenue. Marker is located on the walkway at McCloud Lake across from Weber Point. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Stockton CA 95202, United States of America.

We have been informed that this sign or monument is no longer there and will not be replaced. This page is an archival view of what was.
 
Other nearby markers.
Charles Weber and the Founding of Stockton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Syd Whittle, November 1, 2009
2. Charles Weber and the Founding of Stockton Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Sperry Flour Mill Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Captain Charles M. Weber Residence (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Sister City Story (about 600 feet away); Head of Navigation (about 600 feet away); Weber Point Home – 1850 (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Compass Rose (approx. 0.2 miles away); Weber Point (approx. 0.2 miles away); World War II Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stockton.
 
Regarding Charles Weber and the Founding of Stockton. See "Nearby Markers" for additional information regarding Charles Weber and Weber Point.
 
Additional keywords. Gold Rush
 
Marker removed/vandalized image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Joseph Alvarado, June 26, 2022
3. Marker removed/vandalized
Close-Up of Photo on Marker image. Click for full size.
4. Close-Up of Photo on Marker
Daguerreotype of Charles Maria Weber taken by William Rulofson in 1850
Close-Up of Drawing on Marker image. Click for full size.
5. Close-Up of Drawing on Marker
Drawing of Charles M. Weber from an 1880 Photograph
Mansion Footprint image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Joseph Alvarado, June 26, 2022
6. Mansion Footprint
Close-Up of Photo on Marker image. Click for full size.
7. Close-Up of Photo on Marker
An early drawing of part of Weber’s Mexican land grant showing McLeod Lake (labeled as Laguna de McCloud) and the San Joaquin River (Rio San Joaquin).
Courtesy Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley
Drawing of The Weber Home image. Click for full size.
8. Drawing of The Weber Home
Weber Point image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Syd Whittle, November 1, 2009
9. Weber Point
Marker can be seen at the far left of photo.
Residence of Captain Charles M. Weber image. Click for full size.
Reproduced from the Libr Archives of the Pioneer Museum and Haggin Galleries
10. Residence of Captain Charles M. Weber
Description on postcard: RESIDENCE OF CAPTAIN CHARLES M. WEBER, FOUNDER OF STOCKTON, 1850. Near El Dorado and Channel Sts. This was the first elaborate residence in the San Joaquin Valley. It burned down about 1917. The site is now occupied by the Holiday Inn.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 30, 2022. It was originally submitted on November 7, 2009, by Syd Whittle of Mesa, Arizona. This page has been viewed 4,190 times since then and 455 times this year. Last updated on June 29, 2022, by Joseph Alvarado of Livermore, California. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 7, 2009, by Syd Whittle of Mesa, Arizona.   3. submitted on June 29, 2022, by Joseph Alvarado of Livermore, California.   4, 5. submitted on November 7, 2009, by Syd Whittle of Mesa, Arizona.   6. submitted on June 28, 2022, by Joseph Alvarado of Livermore, California.   7, 8, 9. submitted on November 7, 2009, by Syd Whittle of Mesa, Arizona.   10. submitted on February 9, 2009, by Syd Whittle of Mesa, Arizona.

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Jun. 21, 2024