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Near Hubbardton in Rutland County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Welcome to the Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site

 
 
Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Steve Stoessel, July 8, 2022
1. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site Marker
Inscription.  
Starting here, follow the path to your right to the top of Monument Hill. A series of signs identify battle landmarks and explain the battle action that unfolded here. Enjoy exploring!

On July 5 and 6, 1777, the Northern American Army under Major General Arthur St. Clair was withdrawing southward from the Lake Champlain forts of Mount Independence and Ticonderoga. Here an American rear guard of 1,000 to 1,200 men, led by Colonel Seth Warner with Colonel Ebenezer Francis, engaged British forces that were attempting to carry out Lieutenant General John Burgoyne's plan to split off New England from the other American states.

This battle was the first time Burgoyne's forces met the resistance of American soldiers. The Americans successfully ensured the safety of the main army by engaging and delaying the British, and then disengaging. Approximate numbers of battle participants were 1,100 Americans, 850 British, and 180 Germans. Casualties, including the dead, wounded, and prisoners, were roughly 27% of all participating.

“Thank the troops in my name, for behaving so well as they did at
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Hubbardton." Major General Philip Schuyler, American Northern Department Commander

[Caption:]
Left: Major General Arthur St. Clair, the last American commander of Mount Independence and Fort Ticonderoga (Charles Willson Peale, artist, 1782; Independence National Historical Park)

Right: Lieutenant General John Burgoyne, commander of the British troops in the 1777 Northern Campaign expedition (Sir Joshua Reynolds, artist, c.1766; The Frick Collection)

Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, the Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site is where the only battle of the American Revolution fought entirely in what would become Vermont took place on July 7, 1777.

The Battle of Hubbardton is significant in the Revolutionary War's northern campaign of 1776-1777. It is considered a remarkable rear guard action in American military history.
 
Erected by Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Revolutionary. A significant historical date for this entry is July 7, 1777.
 
Location. 43° 41.741′ N, 73° 8.346′ W. Marker is near Hubbardton, Vermont, in Rutland County. Marker can be reached from Monument Hill Road
Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Steve Stoessel, July 8, 2023
2. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site Marker
Monument Hill can be seen to the left. This is the hill where the first American line formed.
, 0.1 miles north of St. John Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5696 Monument Hill Rd, Castleton VT 05735, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Hubbardton (within shouting distance of this marker); Hubbardton Battle Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Germans Arrive, Americans Retreat (within shouting distance of this marker); Monument Hill And The Morning Charge (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Beginnings of the Battle (about 500 feet away); British Flank The Americans (about 500 feet away); British Flank Near Mt. Zion (about 600 feet away); The Selleck Cabin (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hubbardton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Hubbardton (Wikipedia). (Submitted on July 10, 2022, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.)
2. Saratoga Campaign (Wikipedia).
The Saratoga campaign in 1777 was an attempt by the British high command for North America to gain military control of the strategically important Hudson River valley during the American Revolutionary War. It ended in the surrender of the British army [at Saratoga].
(Submitted on July 10, 2022, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.) 
 
Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Steve Stoessel, July 8, 2022
3. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site and Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 19, 2024. It was originally submitted on July 9, 2022, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 128 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 9, 2022, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 12, 2024