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Shippensburg in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Occupation of Shippensburg

 
 
Occupation of Shippensburg Marker image. Click for more information.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 3, 2018
1. Occupation of Shippensburg Marker
The Rebels Are Coming! – The Confederate Invasion of Shippensburg
Shippensburg and the Civil War website entry
Click for more information.
Inscription.  The first major military engagement in Cumberland County during the Civil War took place in Shippensburg in the week leading up to the Battle of Gettysburg. As the action moved close to Shippensburg many in the town climbed onto their rooftops to observe the fight and to avoid being mistaken for a soldier.

Confederate Brigadier General Albert Jenkins and his cavalry arrived in Shippensburg on the afternoon of June 23, 1863. Around 2 p.m. Captain William Boyd and his Union cavalry moved along Main Street, now King Street, under pressure from the Confederate forces, and by 3 p.m. the Confederates were in possession of the entire town.

After clearing Shippensburg of Union cavalry, Jenkins' troops scavenged the town for supplies. They found the tannery and home of William McLean and set about looking for any finished leather. McLean had hidden his leather in the false bottoms of his tanning vats, which the Confederates never found. Jenkins' troops also visited a grist mill which was on the north side of town where they seized an estimated $30,000 worth of flour and grain.

The Confederates camped in and near Shippensburg
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from June 23-27, when they began to move towards Carlisle.

[Photo/illustration captions read]
• Union Cavalry Captain William Boyd

• Street life in Shippensburg c. 1863
 
Erected by Pennsylvania Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Patriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Pennsylvania Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical date for this entry is June 23, 1863.
 
Location. 40° 3.025′ N, 77° 31.246′ W. Marker is in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker is at the intersection of West King Street (U.S. 11) and Earl Street, on the left when traveling west on West King Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2 West King Street, Shippensburg PA 17257, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. White-Washed in the Nick of Time: The Union (Sherman House) Hotel (here, next to this marker); Rebel Headquarters in Shippensburg, June 24-27, 1863 (a few steps from this marker); General Samuel Sturgis: Hero of Antietam's Burnside Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Lifeline of the Valley: The Cumberland Valley Railroad (within shouting distance of this marker); "On This Site"
Occupation of Shippensburg Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 3, 2018
2. Occupation of Shippensburg Marker
Angled to reduce sun's glare for better view of marker
(about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Residence of George H. Stewart, Sr. (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mc Lean House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Shippensburg (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Shippensburg.
 
Also see . . .  Pennsylvania Civil War Trails. Website homepage (Submitted on July 12, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Occupation of Shippensburg Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 3, 2018
3. Occupation of Shippensburg Marker
Nearest marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 14, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 12, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 604 times since then and 51 times this year. Last updated on July 13, 2022, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 12, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 23, 2024