Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Waco in McLennan County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Waco Tornado

 
 
The Waco Tornado Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
1. The Waco Tornado Marker
Inscription.  One of the most disastrous tornadoes in Texas history swept through downtown Waco on the afternoon of May 11, 1953, killing 114 people, destroying 346 buildings and creating property damage in excess of $50 million. Some of the worst devastation occurred at this site, where 22 employees of the R.T. Dennis Furniture Company died when the building collapsed. Aid to the city came in the form of volunteer and, military rescue forces and donations totaling over $9 million. The rescue and restoration efforts that followed reflected Waco's strong sense of pride and community spirit.
 
Erected 1983 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 5449.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Disasters. A significant historical date for this entry is May 11, 1953.
 
Location. 31° 33.426′ N, 97° 7.878′ W. Marker is in Waco, Texas, in McLennan County. Marker is on Austin Avenue, 0.1 miles west of South 4th Street, on the left when traveling west. The marker is located south side of the street at the entrance to a parking lot. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Austin Avenue, Waco TX 76701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Alico Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Brann-Davis Shootings (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gerald-Harris Shooting (about 300 feet away); The Courthouses of McLennan County (about 600 feet away); McLennan County Courthouse (about 600 feet away); Waco (about 700 feet away); The C.C. McCulloch House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Waco Theatre (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waco.
 
Also see . . .  Waco Tornado. Waco History
On the morning of May 11, the New Orleans Weather Bureau issued a tornado warning for West and Central Texas. Yet life in Waco continued at its normal pace. Some Wacoans placed stock in the old Waco Indian legend that claimed that the hills and bluffs surrounding the city kept it safe from tornados. Others, such as Baylor geologist emeritus O.T. Hayward, argued that Waco was situated atop an an uplift on the Balcones escarpment (or fault line) served to precipitate severe weather along the I-35 corridor, which roughly follows the escarpment. Still, few took heed of the storm warnings issued by the National Weather Service that day, as the weather was the same as it had been for days: warm and muggy. Source: Amanda Sawyer
(Submitted on August 8, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.)
The Waco Tornado Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse
2. The Waco Tornado Marker
 
 
Sculptures by Mark White commemorate the Waco Tornado image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse
3. Sculptures by Mark White commemorate the Waco Tornado
The view of the Waco Tornado Marker from the street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
4. The view of the Waco Tornado Marker from the street
The Waco Tornado image. Click for full size.
Public Domain - NWS Fort Worth/Dallas, Texas, circa May 11, 1953
5. The Waco Tornado
The ALICO building, the tallest structure in Waco, looming over the destroyed downtown area. The skyscraper itself only received minor damage.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 8, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 7, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 181 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 8, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=203363

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
U.S. FTC REQUIRED NOTICE: This website earns income from purchases you make after using links to Amazon.com. Thank you.
Paid Advertisements
Feb. 25, 2024