Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Beaver in Beaver County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort McIntosh 1784-1785 The First American Regiment and The Treaty of Fort McIntosh

 
 
Fort McIntosh 1784-1785 The First American Regiment Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, July 24, 2022
1. Fort McIntosh 1784-1785 The First American Regiment Marker
Inscription.  In October 1784 a treaty was drawn at Fort Stanwix, New York, between the Americans and the Six Nations of the Iroquois in which the Indian Nations were to forfeit all claims to a small portion of Westem New York as well as to the Ohio Country lands lying north of the Ohio River. With the Revolutionary War over and the country deeply in debt, Pennsylvania needed a clear title to her western lands so that the soldiers of the Pennsylvania Line could be given Donation Lands, based on their ranks, as compensation for their military service. Other lands would be set aside as Depreciation Lands that would be sold at auction to pay down the war debt.

Neither the Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot nor any of the other western tribes who actually occupied the land were present at far-away Fort Stanwix, and thus a second treaty was needed. This took place in January 1785 here at Fort McIntosh. Since the Continental Army had been disbanded, it was necessary to raise a new army to protect and enforce the new treaty. Colonel Josiah Harmar was directed to enlist a regiment 'not to exceed 700 men” to reactivate Fort McIntosh. Pennsylvania
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
was the only state to provide troops. Late in 1784 when the regiment arrived at Fort McIntosh, their first permanent post, Harmar named them the First American Regiment. The soldiers were charged with guarding the Treaty Commissioners who met here with 400 chiefs and braves from the Indian Nations. The new treaty - the Treaty of Fort Mcintosh-was imposed "by right of conquest” and required the Indians to forfeit all prior claims to the lands north of the Ohio River, including all of the Northwest Territory.

The First American Regiment survives today as the Presidential Honor Guard - the proud "Old Guard” of the Third Infantry Division - and is recognized as the first and oldest regular unit in the United States Army.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Forts and Castles. A significant historical month for this entry is January 1785.
 
Location. 40° 41.461′ N, 80° 18.244′ W. Marker is in Beaver, Pennsylvania, in Beaver County. Marker is on River Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 740 River Rd, Beaver PA 15009, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort McIntosh 1776 The Frontier (here, next to this marker); Commanding Officers (here, next to this marker); Fort McIntosh 1778 The Campaign (a few steps from this marker); Fort McIntosh 1978 The Site Restoration
Fort McIntosh 1784-1785 The First American Regiment and The Treaty of Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, July 24, 2022
2. Fort McIntosh 1784-1785 The First American Regiment and The Treaty of Fort McIntosh Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Fort McIntosh (a few steps from this marker); General Lachlan McIntosh (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Fort McIntosh (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort McIntosh (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Beaver.
 
Also see . . .  Beaver Area Heritage Museum. (Submitted on August 19, 2022, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 23, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 19, 2022, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 226 times since then and 118 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 19, 2022, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=204300

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 19, 2024