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Cambridge in Dorchester County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Bayly Historic Site

 
 
The Bayly Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), August 27, 2022
1. The Bayly Historic Site Marker
Inscription.  
Perhaps one of the oldest buildings in Cambridge, the Bayly home was lived in by affluent and accomplished Maryland families. Although we know a fair amount about Dr. Alexander Hamilton Bayly, there is little known about the dozens of enslaved African Americans who also called this place home.

The main house was built sometime in the mid-18th century and moved to Cambridge; first to the location of the court house, and finally, to its current address. Once placed here, outbuildings and small homes quickly filled in along the lot lines and backyard. These were the places where Bayly's enslaved servants lived and worked. In fact, a "slave cabin" may still be standing in the backyard today.

Archaeologists have teamed up with Dorchester County. Catherine Morrison, and Bob Moffatt, to try and solve the mystery of this cabin. The scientists are hoping to find evidence the alleged slave cabin was a home before emancipation. The archaeologists will be looking for: fragments of inexpensive dishes broken and tossed away prior to the mid-19th century; certain animal bones that represent food waste by people of lesser means;
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and evidence of spirit practices (e.g. pierced silver coins or crystals), popular among some African Americans of the time. By using scientific methods and historical research, they are hoping to learn more about the people who once lived at 207 High Street.

Notice: The site is a closed excavation and is located on private property.

[Captions:]
Oral tradition speaks to this humble, one room house with a loft being lived in by AFrican Americans enslaved by the Baylys. In fact, the 1885 Sanborn map shows the building standing in the backyard.

Although modified, this building reflects a time when many Marylanders were not free. Archaeologists will use dendrochronology, a science that uses tree ring patterns, to date this building.

 
Erected by State Highway Administration, Maryland Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 2.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansAnthropology & ArchaeologyChurches & Religion. A significant historical year for this entry is 1885.
 
Location. 38° 34.366′ N, 76° 4.537′ W. Marker is in Cambridge, Maryland, in Dorchester County. Marker is on High Street south of C Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map
The Bayly Historic Site Marker with the house in the background image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), August 27, 2022
2. The Bayly Historic Site Marker with the house in the background
Please respect that the house is private property.
. Marker is at or near this postal address: 207 High St, Cambridge MD 21613, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. High Street District & Bayly House (here, next to this marker); Goldsborough House (a few steps from this marker); This Bell (within shouting distance of this marker); Gov. Emerson Columbus Harrington (within shouting distance of this marker); Patriot John Brohawn (within shouting distance of this marker); Patriot Lt. John Stewart McNamara (within shouting distance of this marker); Patriot Richard Pattison (within shouting distance of this marker); Governor John Henry (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cambridge.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 29, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 29, 2022, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 62 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 29, 2022, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Feb. 24, 2024