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Anaconda in Deer Lodge County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda

 
 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, August 6, 2022
1. Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda Marker
Inscription.  Itinerant circuit riders brought Methodism to this part of Montana as early as 1880. Anaconda’s first Methodist church was built in 1884, but its small band of followers had scattered by the time Reverend Philip Lowry was assigned here in 1889. He and his wife arrived to find no church building, a poorly built two-room dwelling, and a congregation of only seven discouraged members. During their five-year stay, the Reverend and Mrs. Lowry bolstered the congregation both spiritually and financially, increasing the membership to over 100 and raising funds for a new building. Copper King Marcus Daly helped provide the bricks, and the $8,000 church was dedicated, free from debt, on December 14, 1890. By 1896, membership had grown to 553 and the church was overcrowded. Architect Henry Nelson Black drew the plans and contractor Joseph Smith substantially rebuilt the original Gothic style church, adding a tower and widening, lengthening, and heightening the building. Pointed arches, lanceolate windows, and steeply pitched roof further define the Gothic Revival style. At its dedication on August 22, 1897, three wagon loads of flowers decorated the magnificent
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new church. Bishop Earl Cranston of Helena, Superintendent W. W. Van Orsdel, Reverend W. T. Euster, and many ministers of other Anaconda churches crowded the pulpit platform. Although a rear addition expanded the facilities in 1905, both interior and exterior remain true to the historic design. Among the exquisite stained glass windows is the “Lowry window,” given in memory of the couple to whom, more than to any others, the church is indebted for it permanency and growth.
 
Erected by Montana Historical Society.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionNotable Buildings. In addition, it is included in the Montana National Register Sign Program series list.
 
Location. 46° 7.689′ N, 112° 57.104′ W. Marker is in Anaconda, Montana, in Deer Lodge County. Marker is at the intersection of Oak Street and East Third Street, on the right when traveling north on Oak Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 221 Oak Street, Anaconda MT 59711, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 119-125 East Park Avenue (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Parrot Block (about 400 feet away); Furst Block (about 400 feet away); St. Jean Block/Smiths Building
Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, August 6, 2022
2. Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda and Marker
(about 400 feet away); Morse/Palace Block (about 400 feet away); National Bank of Anaconda (about 400 feet away); Weiss Block (about 400 feet away); Washoe Theater (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anaconda.
 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, August 6, 2022
3. Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda
Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, August 6, 2022
4. Methodist Episcopal Church of Anaconda
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 9, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 9, 2022, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 63 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 9, 2022, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.

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Apr. 17, 2024