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Norwich in Muskingum County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Ralph Hardesty Stone House

The Historic National Road in Ohio

— The Road That Helped Build The Nation —

 
 
The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 3, 2022
1. The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker
Inscription.  
Built in 1836 for Ralph Hardesty at a cost of $500, the original stone portion of this house measures 40 by 22 feet. Little is known of Mr. Hardesty except that he was listed in the 1850 Census, when he was 43 years of age. The two-story house, constructed of local sandstone with a slate roof, features a symmetrical facade with a central doorway. It is the first and only stone house in Norwich. The windows still have their original lintels and sills. The sandstone blocks on the front and east walls are "dressed," that is, they are finished, while the stone on the west and rear walls are rubble stone or unfinished. Like most houses, this home has its decorative elements on the front and on the side that visitors will see as they approach.

While using stone as the building material for a house was rare in this area, the Hardesty House is an I-House, a very popular type of building in the nineteenth century. An I-House has two rooms downstairs and two rooms upstairs. Some, like this house, have central hallways with a staircase. An I-House has only four rooms, but it looks larger and offers a wide view from the second-floor windows.
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Being more compact than a four-room One-story house, it is easier to heat in the winter and offers better ventilation in the summer. I-Houses are found in the Midwest as well as in the Mid-Atlantic states.

[Captions:]
The Ralph Hardesty House was place on the National Register of Historic Places on March 11, 1980.

The photos below illustrate the difference between unfinished, rough stonework (left) and pointed, finished work (right). The rough stonework used a variety of sizes and shapes with irregular mortar joints. Carefukky cut and sized stones from the finished (dressed) work. Note the raised mortar joints - these are of contemporary origin when general maintenance was done on the mortar joints. The stones on the front and east side of the Hardesty House have a rough-pointed surface with a chiseled margin.

The mason's hand hammer, which weighed from 2 to 5 pounds and had a short handle, was often used with a chisel to point or remove excess material from the surface of a stone.

To the right are two common types of stone working tools. The first is a point chisel - 8 to 12 inches long and used to chip off rough surfaces. This is a tool probably used to create the surface of the finished stone.

To the far right is a tooth chisel - used to produce a finer surface than the point chisel. This tool, or one
The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 3, 2022
2. The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker
similar to it, would have been used to make the chiseled margins.

 
Erected by THe Ohio National ROad Association, Inc.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Architecture. In addition, it is included in the The Historic National Road series list. A significant historical date for this entry is March 11, 1980.
 
Location. 39° 59.071′ N, 81° 47.618′ W. Marker is in Norwich, Ohio, in Muskingum County. Marker is at the intersection of Norwich Drive and Harding Way Road, on the right when traveling west on Norwich Drive. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10405 Norwich Dr, Norwich OH 43767, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. First Traffic Fatality in Ohio / The National Road (approx. 0.3 miles away); In Memory of Christopher Baldwin (approx. 0.4 miles away); Norwich (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Norwich (approx. half a mile away); Motels (approx. 1.6 miles away); The Historic National Road (approx. 1.7 miles away); The Historic National Road in Ohio (approx. 1.7 miles away); Mile Markers (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Norwich.
 
The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 3, 2022
3. The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker
The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 3, 2022
4. The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker
The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, September 3, 2022
5. The Ralph Hardesty Stone House Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 19, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 10, 2022, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 85 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 10, 2022, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 20, 2024