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Athens in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Chapters in Athens Heritage

Living by the River

 
 
Chapters in Athens Heritage Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, June 19, 2021
1. Chapters in Athens Heritage Marker
Inscription.  Generation after generation of people worked, shopped, played, prayed, married, and were buried within this river-based community.

Many former slaves settled into small houses on the floodplain of the North Oconee River in areas called Lickskillet and Over the River. Residents along the low-lying banks of the river were plagued by disease and flooding. The more prosperous mill workers lived on the drier surrounding hills. Each part of the community had its own music, gardens, sports teams, stores, schools, and churches. The people worked long hours, but also enjoyed playing and praying by the river. In the 1960s many river edge-homes were removed by the federal urban renewal program. When the textile mill closed in 1977 the mill village faded, and a diverse riverside neighborhood emerged.

(sidebar)
Lickskillet Neighborhood
The Ware-Lynden House is the only structure still remaining on its original lot from the once fashionable 19th-century in-town neighborhood which contained many of Athens' finest Antebellum homes. At the neighborhood extended down the hill toward the river, the homes were
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smaller and less ornate. The "Lickskillet" Neighborhood Historical boundaries were Clayton, Jackson, and Hoyt Streets and the Oconee River. The neighborhood went into decline in the mid-20th century and the remaining homes were demolished by the federal urban renewal program of the 1960s.

1800's historical map of Downton Athens

(captions)
African-American bome in the Licksbillet area of Athens near the Oconee River.

Church congregations gathered at the shoals by Trail Creek for baptism by immersion.

Before window screening, smallpox and malaria were deadly problems in the lowest and wettest areas of riverside housing. Quinine was sold to combat malaria, a disease spread by mosquitoes.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 33° 57.462′ N, 83° 21.968′ W. Marker is in Athens, Georgia, in Athens-Clarke County. Marker is on East Broad Street east of First Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1170 E Broad St, Athens GA 30601, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Chapters in Athens Heritage (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Chapters in Athens Heritage (a few steps from
Chapters in Athens Heritage Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, June 19, 2021
2. Chapters in Athens Heritage Marker
this marker); a different marker also named Chapters in Athens Heritage (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Chapters in Athens Heritage (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Chapters in Athens Heritage (a few steps from this marker); Mill Products (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Mill Products (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mill Products (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Athens.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 20, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 18, 2022, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. This page has been viewed 174 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 18, 2022, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 13, 2024