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Frankfort in Franklin County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Texas War of Independence   1836

The Mexican War 1846 - 1844

 
 
The Texas War of Independence 1836 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, August 30, 2022
1. The Texas War of Independence 1836 Marker
Inscription.  Kentuckians explored the western frontier after the War of 1812. When Texas rebelled against Mexican rule in 1836, many Kentuckians had friends or relatives there and took an interest in the fate of the new Texas Republic.

500 Kentuckians volunteered to fight for Texas Independence, Captain Burr Hamilton Duval's Kentucky "Mustangs" from Hardstown were forced to surrender to the Mexicans at Goliad on 27 March 1886. 37 men were executed, seven escaped, and only one was spared, another 12 Kentuckians died within the walls of the Alamo during that infamous siege. Other Kentucky volunteers fought in the final victory for Texas at the Battle of San Jacinto.

An independent nation for nearly 10 years, Texas accepted statehood in the United States in 2845. This proved intolerable to Mexico, and the two countries returned to war in 1845. The United States government requested 2400 troops from Kentucky. 13,000 Kentuckians responded to the early calls for volunteer soldiers.

Kentucky's oldest National Guard Unit, the Louisville Legion, was accepted for duty and saw its first combat during the war. Most Kentucky Units fought
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under the command of Louisvillian General Zachary Taylor in northern Mexico.

Fighting first at Monterey, the Kentuckians saw heavy combat during the Battle of Buena Vista, a decisive defeat for the Mexicans. A smaller detachment of Kentuckians was praised for its part in the Battle of Cerro Gordo during the Approach to Mexico City. Frankfort's Captain John Williamson the Sobriquet "Cherro Gordo" Williams for his roll in the victory.

Casualties among Kentuckians were high in this war. Many of victims are buried on the State Mound, including Regular Army Mjor Phillip Barbour, killed at Monterey, and Henry Clay, Jr., who died at Buena Vista. Following the war, the Commonwealth of Kentucky buried the Buena Vista dead here with great ceremony. Theodore O'Hara wrote the famous poem "Bivouac of the Dead" for the occasion. In 1856 Kentucky erected the military monumentand dedicated it in gratitude equally to her officers and soldiers.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: War, Mexican-AmericanWar, Texas Independence. A significant historical date for this entry is March 27, 1886.
 
Location. 38° 11.612′ N, 84° 51.881′ W. Marker is in Frankfort, Kentucky, in Franklin County. Marker is on East Main Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 215 E Main St, Frankfort KY 40601, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
The Texas War of Independence 1836 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Doda, August 30, 2022
2. The Texas War of Independence 1836 Marker
are within walking distance of this marker. Spanish-American War (here, next to this marker); War of 1812 (here, next to this marker); Civil War (here, next to this marker); World War I (here, next to this marker); War Of Independence (a few steps from this marker); Korean Conflict (a few steps from this marker); The Persian Gulf War (a few steps from this marker); Vietnam Conflict (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frankfort.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 21, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 20, 2022, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 375 times since then and 204 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 20, 2022, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 22, 2024