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Fort Sill in Comanche County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

U.S. M1 4.5-inch Gun

 
 
U.S. M1 4.5-inch Gun Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 9, 2021
1. U.S. M1 4.5-inch Gun Marker
Inscription.  This is one of the lesser-known American artillery pieces of World War II. In the 1920s, the US Army Ordnance Department designed two new pieces, a 4.7-inch gun and a 155mm howitzer. The Westervelt Board, a post-World War I committee studying artillery design, further recommended the adoption of the 155mm howitzer as part of the Divisional Artillery replacing the existing 3-inch/75mm pieces. The design was such that the new 4.7-inch gun and its companion, the 155mm howitzer, would use the same carriage. With the onset of World War II, the Ordnance Department decided that the bore diameter of the 4.7-inch gun would be changed to 4.5-inches to allow ammunition compatibility with that of our British allies. The 4.5-inch Gun was found to have exceptional range. However, due to the use of inferior steel in the ammunition, which required thicker shell walls, the bursting charge of the projectile was inferior to even that of the 105mm howitzer. Seventeen battalions fighting in Italy and France were equipped with the 4.5-inch Gun. By October of 1945, the gun was withdrawn from service and declared obsolete. It was replaced by the superior 155mm Howitzer,
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M1/M114, whose accuracy was more consistent at maximum range.

Caliber - 4.5 in. - 114 mm
Weight - 12,455 lbs. - 5,654 kg
Range - 25,715 yds. - 23,529 m
Shell Weight - 55 lbs. - 24.9 kg
Muzzle Velocity - 2,274 ft/sec. - 693 m/sec.
Elevation - 0 to 60 degrees - 0 to 1066 mils
Traverse - 53 degrees - 942 mils
Rate of Fire - 4 rpm
CCN# 122444
 
Erected by U.S. Army Field Artillery Museum. (Marker Number 320.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, World II. A significant historical month for this entry is October 1945.
 
Location. 34° 40.006′ N, 98° 23.115′ W. Marker is in Fort Sill, Oklahoma, in Comanche County. Marker is at the intersection of Corral Road and Randolph Road, on the right when traveling west on Corral Road. The marker is located in the central section of Artillery Park at the U.S. Army Field Artillery Museum. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Sill OK 73503, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. German Heavy 10cm K-18 Cannon (a few steps from this marker); U.S. M1 8-Inch Gun (a few steps from this marker); U.S. M43 8-inch Howitzer Motor Carriage (within shouting distance of this marker); German 210mm Howitzer 18 (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. 8-Inch Howitzer, M1/M115
The U.S. M1 4.5-inch Gun and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 9, 2021
2. The U.S. M1 4.5-inch Gun and Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); French GPF 155mm Gun, Model of 1917 (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. JB-2 Loon Guided Missile (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. M21 4.5-inch Rocket Launcher (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Sill.
 
More about this marker. Marker and Museum are located on Fort Sill, an active U.S. military installation. The museum is open to the public, but appropriate identification is required for access for Fort Sill.
 
Also see . . .  U.S. Army Artillery Museum. (Submitted on September 20, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.)
 
The U.S. M1 4.5-inch Gun and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 9, 2021
3. The U.S. M1 4.5-inch Gun and Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 21, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 20, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 141 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 20, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Apr. 15, 2024