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Dayton in Liberty County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Dayton's Namesake

 
 
Dayton's Namesake Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 25, 2022
1. Dayton's Namesake Marker
Inscription.  Isaiah Cates Day, for whom the town of Dayton is named, was born in Shelby Co. Tennessee on June 12, 1812. His family tradition says that he came to Texas in 1830 with Sam Houston, with whom he remained a life-long friend. Day married Alice D. Stuart on July 27, 1835 and after her death married Rachel Whitlock on August 31, 1842. She was the daughter of William Whitlock, an early settler who owned land along South Winfree Road. The Days had three children - Amanda, Mary Elizabeth, and James.

After Rachel died in 1850, Day married Martha Caroline Munson Pruett Orr. She was widowed twice, having been married to Edmond Pruett and William Orr. Martha Caroline was the daughter of Micajah and Elizabeth Munson, some of the earliest settlers of West Liberty, as Dayton was known prior to 1885. Isaiah and Martha Caroline built their plantation on Munson land located south of town and Day became a cattleman. He amassed up to 4,800 head of cattle worth $19,200 and owned property not only in Liberty County, but also Harris, Chambers, and Galveston Counties, including land in Houston. In the 1860 census, Day owned real property valued at $25,000
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and personal property valued at $65,000.

In 1853, the Texas-New Orleans Railroad was being built through West Liberty and Day helped this enterprise by having his men work on it. The Days owned 52 slaves according to the 1860 Slave Schedule of Liberty County.

Railroad men began referring to the community as Day's Town or Day's Station and the name Dayton was applied to the local post office in 1877, although the official name remained West Liberty until the mid 1880s.

Isaiah and Martha Caroline had one child: Martha "Mattie" Emilie, born in 1857. On January 15, 1860, Martha Caroline died giving birth to a second child who also died. She is buried in the Pruett Family plot at French Cemetery. Day also fathered nine children with one of his slaves, Amanda Cribbs, who included Aaron Jr. and Henderson.

Isaiah Day did business with and was the best friend of one the members of the Luke Bryan Family of Liberty which may be why, when he died at age 66 on March 10, 1879, he was buried in the Bryan-Neyland Cemetery in Liberty. During his lifetime, he was a well-respected, honest, wealthy, and successful man and the town of Dayton stands as a tribute to him.

Captions
Upper Right: Brand Used by Isaiah C. Day
 
Erected by Dayton Historical Society.
 
Topics. This
Dayton's Namesake Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 25, 2022
2. Dayton's Namesake Marker
historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & SettlersWomen. A significant historical date for this entry is January 15, 1860.
 
Location. 30° 2.774′ N, 94° 53.218′ W. Marker is in Dayton, Texas, in Liberty County. Marker is at the intersection of North Highway 146 (U.S. 90) and North Church Street, on the right when traveling west on North Highway 146. The marker is located along a pathway in the small city park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Dayton TX 77535, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dayton's Early History (here, next to this marker); Dayton's Early Economy (a few steps from this marker); Early History of Dayton's African American Community (a few steps from this marker); 1937 Dayton City Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); The Murder of Louis "Frenchy" Cashat (within shouting distance of this marker); Dayton's Volunteer Fire Department (within shouting distance of this marker); Dayton Egg Circle (within shouting distance
The Dayton's Namesake Marker along the road image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 25, 2022
3. The Dayton's Namesake Marker along the road
of this marker); Dayton World War II Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dayton.
 
Also see . . .  Dayton, TX. Texas State Historical Association
Sometime after 1854 West Liberty also became known as Day's Town, for I. C. Day, a wealthy landowner who resided just to the south of the town on the Munson league. The flag stop for the Texas and New Orleans Railroad, completed in 1860, was known variously as West Liberty, Days Station, and Dayton Station. The name Dayton was applied to the local post office in 1877, though the official name of the town remained West Liberty until the mid-1880s. In 1885 Dayton reported a population of sixty, and in 1890 a post office, a school, and two churches served its 239 residents. Lumbering and cattle raising were the chief industries until James E. Berry helped establish a drainage system to make rice a major crop.
(Submitted on September 27, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
Isaiah Cates Day gravestone in Bryan-Neyland Cemetery in Liberty image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 25, 2022
4. Isaiah Cates Day gravestone in Bryan-Neyland Cemetery in Liberty
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 27, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 27, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 206 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 27, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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