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New Ulm in Brown County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Charles Eugene Flandrau

 
 
Charles Eugene Flandrau Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Liz Koele, January 4, 2022
1. Charles Eugene Flandrau Marker
Inscription.  

The colorful frontiersman credited with giving Minnesota the nickname of the Gopher State was born in 1828 in New York City of French Huguenot and Irish ancestry. As a young lawyer he moved to Minnesota in 1853. After exploring the Minnesota River Valley for two years, he settled at Traverse des Sioux until 1864 and became known as the Defender of New Ulm in the Dakota War of 1862.

A lifelong Democrat, Flandrau rose rapidly in the frontier hierarchy. He became territorial legislator, Indian Agent, delegate to Minnesota’s constitutional convention, and member of the territorial and state supreme courts (1857 - 1864). Like many of the state’s male pioneers, he was an active member of the Minnesota Historical Society’s executive council. He took his duties there seriously, drawing on personal experience to establish a considerable reputation as a historian of the young state. Flandrau authored numerous published speeches as well as such hefty tomes as Encyclopedia of Biography of Minnesota and The History of Minnesota and Tales of the Frontier, both published in 1900. Flandrau’s published works earned him a piece of Minnesota
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immortality.

He was also known far and wide as a raconteur. When he died in St. Paul in 1903, one eulogy declared, “Minnesota owned Flandrau. They called upon him for addresses upon all sorts of occasions, whether to act as toastmaster or make a speech at a banquet, to celebrate an important historical event, to grace a reception, to make a memorial address, to preside at a convention, or to open a fair.
 
Erected 1996 by Minnesota Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Settlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1828.
 
Location. 44° 17.542′ N, 94° 28.196′ W. Marker is in New Ulm, Minnesota, in Brown County. Marker can be reached from Highway 26 west of Summit Avenue when traveling west. The marker is located within Flandrau State Park and is placed in front of the WPA-era Beachhouse Shelter. It is accessible via an unnamed road which leads to the large parking area near the shelter. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New Ulm MN 56073, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hermann Monument (approx. one mile away); The Wallachei (approx. 1.1 miles away); Waraju Distillery (approx. 1.1 miles away); Joseph A. Harman (approx. 1.2 miles away); Junior Pioneers of New Ulm and Vicinity
Charles Eugene Flandrau Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Liz Koele, January 4, 2022
2. Charles Eugene Flandrau Marker
(approx. 1.3 miles away); Turner Hall (approx. 1.3 miles away); 2011 Centennial of The Church of St. Mary (approx. 1.3 miles away); Brown County Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Ulm.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 30, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 30, 2022, by Liz Koele of St. Paul, Minnesota. This page has been viewed 109 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 30, 2022, by Liz Koele of St. Paul, Minnesota. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 24, 2024