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Temple in Bell County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Site of 42nd Reunion of Hood's Texas Brigade

(June 27-28, 1913)

 
 
Site of 42nd Reunion of Hood's Texas Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 28, 2022
1. Site of 42nd Reunion of Hood's Texas Brigade Marker
Inscription.  Honored the late General John B. Hood, for whom Fort Hood was named. Meetings were in First Baptist Church. Transportation from Carnegie Library (convention headquarters) was by one of the first auto parades in Temple.

J.W. Stevens, Chaplain, Hood's original brigade, conducted the annual memorial ceremony. Other speakers included Dr. T.A. Pope, of Cameron, and Hon. W.B. Lane, State Comptroller. Convention ended with rousing rendition of Confederate War song "Dixie".

This association founded in 1872 held reunions until 1934.
 
Erected 1967 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 39.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical year for this entry is 1872.
 
Location. 31° 5.919′ N, 97° 20.438′ W. Marker is in Temple, Texas, in Bell County. Marker is at the intersection of North Main Street and East Barton Avenue, on the right when traveling south on North Main Street. The marker is located on the southwest corner of the intersection. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 112 North Main Street, Temple TX 76501, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
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At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Temple Public Library (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); First United Methodist Church Of Temple (about 300 feet away); Christ Episcopal Church of Temple (about 500 feet away); Pool of Tears Veterans Memorial (about 500 feet away); City of Temple (about 500 feet away); Site of Organization of the Texas Forestry Association (about 500 feet away); Knob Creek Lodge No. 401 (about 700 feet away); Bernard Moore Temple (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Temple.
 
Also see . . .  Hood's Texas Brigade. Texas State Historical Association
Hood's Texas Brigade was organized on October 22, 1861, in Richmond, Virginia. It was initially commanded by Brig. Gen. Louis T. Wigfall and composed of the First, Fourth, and Fifth Texas Infantry regiments, the only Texas troops to fight in the Eastern Theater. The First was commanded by Wigfall and Lt. Col. Hugh McLeod, the Fourth by Col. John Bell Hood and Lt. Col. John Marshall, and the Fifth by Col. James J. Archer and Lt. Jerome B. Robertson. On November 20, 1861, the Eighteenth Georgia Infantry, commanded by William T. Wofford, was attached. On June 1, 1862, eight infantry companies from Wade Hampton's South Carolina Legion, commanded by Lt. Colonel Martin
The view of the Site of 42nd Reunion of Hood's Texas Brigade Marker from the street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 28, 2022
2. The view of the Site of 42nd Reunion of Hood's Texas Brigade Marker from the street
W. Gary, were added, and in November 1862 the Third Arkansas Infantry, commanded by Col. Van H. Manning, joined the brigade. Both the Georgia and South Carolina units were transferred out in November 1862, but the Third Arkansas remained until the end of the war.
(Submitted on October 4, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 5, 2022. It was originally submitted on October 4, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 136 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 4, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jul. 20, 2024