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Ocean City in Cape May County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

U.S. Life-Saving Station 30

 
 
U.S. Life-Saving Station 30 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 16, 2022
1. U.S. Life-Saving Station 30 Marker
Inscription.  
Preservation made possible by
The City of Ocean City
with a matching grant from the
Garden State Historic Preservation Trust
Administered by the
New Jersey Historic Trust
2010

The U.S. Life-Saving Service was founded in 1848 before it became the modern U.S. Coast Guard in 1915. This Life-Saving Station, built in 1886, was one of 42 stations established along the New Jersey coast. Also known as the Beazley's Station, this structure is significant in the areas of transportation, maritime heritage, and architecture. Maritime trade served a vital role in the state's economy and the New Jersey coast saw some of the heaviest coastal traffic in the nation. The Life-Saving Service helped to safeguard the crews who manned these ships by warning them of dangers and rescuing those that were in peril. In 1901, the Sindia, a 329 foot bark, ran aground at 17th Street and the crew was rescued by this service.

After closing in 1936, the station was reopened in the spring of 1941 by the U.S. Coast Guard to house men of the mounted patrol. During World War II, this station
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patrolled the beach looking for German submarines and saboteurs. After the war, the station closed in 1945, it was sold for use as a private residence until 2009 when the City of Ocean City purchased it. Currently used as a living history museum, the station is architecturally significant as the only surviving life-saving station of its kind. It was designed by architect James Lake Parkinson. On April 8, 2013, this station was listed in the New Jersey Register of Historic Places and on June 14, 2013 was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

The City of Ocean City is grateful to the benefactors and volunteers who supported this project. In addition, the city extends its sincere appreciation to the non-profit group U.S. Life-Saving Station 30. Without their endless dedication to this restoration the beautiful structure would not exist.
 
Erected by City of Ocean City, New Jersey.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureCharity & Public WorkWar, World IIWaterways & Vessels. A significant historical year for this entry is 1886.
 
Location. 39° 16.912′ N, 74° 33.945′ W. Marker is in Ocean City, New Jersey, in Cape May County. Marker is on East 4th Street just east of Atlantic Avenue, on the right when traveling west
U.S. Life-Saving Station 30 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 16, 2022
2. U.S. Life-Saving Station 30
The marker hangs to the right of the doorway.
. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 801 E 4th St, Ocean City NJ 08226, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sindia (here, next to this marker); The Ocean City Historic District (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Ocean City Historic District (approx. 0.2 miles away); U.S.S. Arizona Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ocean City War Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ocean City Tabernacle (approx. ¼ mile away); Welcome To Plaza Place (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Ocean City Tabernacle (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ocean City.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 20, 2022. It was originally submitted on October 20, 2022, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 56 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 20, 2022, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Apr. 13, 2024