Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Heights in Little Rock in Pulaski County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Bishop Hiram A. Boaz House

 
 
Bishop Hiram A. Boaz House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 5, 2022
1. Bishop Hiram A. Boaz House Marker
Inscription.  
This property
has been placed on the
National Register
of Historic Places

by the United States
Department of the Interior

 
Erected by Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, Department of Arkansas Heritage.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureChurches & Religion. A significant historical year for this entry is 1926.
 
Location. 34° 46.022′ N, 92° 19.327′ W. Marker is in Little Rock, Arkansas, in Pulaski County. It is in Heights. Marker is at the intersection of Armistead Road and Edgehill Road, on the left when traveling east on Armistead Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 22 Armistead Rd, Little Rock AR 72207, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Block Realty-Baker House (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Heights • A History (approx. one mile away); Memorial Stadium (approx. 1.3 miles away); War Memorial Golf Course (approx. 1.3 miles away); “Stifft's Station” (approx. 1.4 miles
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
away); Over the Jumps (approx. 1½ miles away); Wild Boar (approx. 1½ miles away); Dedicated to You, A Free Citizen in a Free Land (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Little Rock.
 
Regarding Bishop Hiram A. Boaz House. Excerpt from the National Register nomination:
In 1926, Bishop Boaz returned to the United States, and on May 5, the general conference of the Methodist Church met in Memphis, Tennessee. Bishop Boaz was assigned to conferences in Arkansas and Oklahoma for the following quadrennium. As Boaz believed that a bishop should live within the boundaries of his episcopal area, he accepted the offer of Coy Haynes, a Little Rock businessman, to build a home in that city. Bishop Boaz and his wife found plans in Dallas, drawn by the architect Marion Fooshe, that suited their tastes and selected a building lot at 22 Armistead Road in the new and restricted Edgehill Addition. Charles L. Thompson, who was described by Boaz in his autobiography as “an excellent architect and a good Episcopalian,” was the supervising architect and George H. Burden (“a fine builder and a good Methodist”) received the building contract.
Bishop Hiram A. Boaz House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 5, 2022
2. Bishop Hiram A. Boaz House Marker

 
Also see . . .
1. Bishop Hiram A. Boaz House (PDF). National Register nomination for the house, which was listed in 1994. (National Archives) (Submitted on November 25, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 

2. Boaz, Hiram Abiff (1866–1962). A Kentucky native, Boaz was president of Polytechnic College (later Texas Wesleyan University) and Southern Methodist University before he became bishop. (Howard Grimes, The Handbook of Texas, Texas State Historical Association) (Submitted on November 25, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
Bishop Hiram A. Boaz (1866-1962) image. Click for full size.
Unknown via Archives of the Central Texas Conference, United Methodist Church
3. Bishop Hiram A. Boaz (1866-1962)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 10, 2023. It was originally submitted on November 25, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 114 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 25, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=211286

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 21, 2024