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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Macarthur Park in Little Rock in Pulaski County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Johnson House

c. 1877

 
 
Johnson House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 5, 2022
1. Johnson House Marker
Inscription.  The Johnson House was built about 1827 as the residence of Robert W. Johnson and his son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Johnson. Robert W. Johnson had returned to Little Rock in 1876 after a long and distinguished career which included serving in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate prior to the Civil War. During the war, he was elected to represent Arkansas in the Confederate Congress, and after the war, he practiced law in Washington, D.C., until retiring to Little Rock. Following the elder Johnson's death in 1879, the Johnson House continued to serve as the residence of Benjamin S. Johnson, who also was an attorney. The house remained in the Johnson family until the 1920's.

A gift of the Junior League of Little Rock
to the Arkansas Sesquicentennial
June 15, 1986

 
Erected 1986 by Junior League of Little Rock.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Government & Politics. A significant historical year for this entry is 1877.
 
Location. 34° 44.485′ N, 92° 15.975′ 
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W. Marker is in Little Rock, Arkansas, in Pulaski County. It is in Macarthur Park. Marker is on East 7th Street west of Sherman Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 507 E 7th St, Little Rock AR 72202, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nash House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Nash House (about 600 feet away); Trapnall Hall (about 600 feet away); St. Edwards Church (about 700 feet away); Curran Hall (about 800 feet away); Home of Robert Crittenden (approx. ¼ mile away); The Mehlburger Markers (approx. ¼ mile away); The Arsenal Crisis (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Little Rock.
 
Also see . . .  Robert Ward Johnson (1814–1879). Johnson and Governor [Elias Nelson] Conway basically dominated [Arkansas] state politics during the 1850s through their control of the Democratic Party. (James M. Woods, Encyclopedia of Arkansas) (Submitted on November 26, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
Johnson House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 5, 2022
2. Johnson House Marker
Marker is below the fence, to the right of the opening.
Robert Ward Johnson (1814-1879) image. Click for full size.
Julian Vannerson via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division (Public Domain), circa 1859
3. Robert Ward Johnson (1814-1879)
In addition to serving eight years in the U.S. Senate and six in the U.S. House, he also was Attorney General of Arkansas.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 10, 2023. It was originally submitted on November 26, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 98 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 26, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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Apr. 22, 2024