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Newcomerstown in Tuscarawas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Old Delaware Indian Town GEKELEMUKPECHUNK

Stood here until after 1775

 
 
The Old Delaware Indian Town GEKELEMUKPECHUNK Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 13, 2022
1. The Old Delaware Indian Town GEKELEMUKPECHUNK Marker
Inscription.  Leni Lenape Capital under Chief Netawatwes, also called King Newcomer, of the Turtle Tribe.
 
Erected 1954 by Greyhound Post Houses, Inc.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1775.
 
Location. 40° 16.485′ N, 81° 36.473′ W. Marker is in Newcomerstown, Ohio, in Tuscarawas County. Marker is on West Canal Street just east of Rear West Canal, on the right when traveling east. Marker is located beside the sidewalk, directly in front of the Temperance Tavern Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 221 West Canal Street, Newcomerstown OH 43832, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Captain Freeman Davis (a few steps from this marker); Wayne Woodrow "Woody" Hayes (a few steps from this marker); Newcomerstown Korean War Memorial (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Denton "Cy" Young (approx. 0.6 miles away); Cy Young (approx. 0.6 miles away); Newcomerstown Desert Storm Memorial
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(approx. 0.6 miles away); Old Stone Fort (approx. 3.7 miles away); The Salem Mission (approx. 4.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newcomerstown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Netawatwees.
Chief Netawatwees, also called "Newcomer" by Anglo-Americans, was born around 1686. He eventually became the leader of the turtle clan of the Lenape (Delaware) in the Ohio Country. As chief of the turtle clan, Newcomer was the most powerful and influential member of the Lenape nation. He became chief of the turtle clan circa 1757. In 1759, Netawatwees established Gekelmukpechunk. Known as Newcomerstown to white settlers, this village was located east of modern-day Coshocton, Ohio, and became an important Lenape village in the Ohio Country.
(Submitted on November 26, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Delaware Tribe of Indians.
The historically Algonquian-speaking Delaware refer to themselves as Lenni Lenape. At first European contact in the early 17th century, the tribe lived along the Delaware River, named for Lord de la Warr, territory in lower present-day New York state and eastern New Jersey, and western Long Island,
The Old Delaware Indian Town GEKELEMUKPECHUNK Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 13, 2022
2. The Old Delaware Indian Town GEKELEMUKPECHUNK Marker
(marker is located near northeast corner of the Temperance Tavern Museum)
New York.

The Delaware nation was the first to sign a treaty with the new United States. They signed the treaty on the September 17, 1778. Despite the treaty, the Delaware were forced to cede their Eastern lands and moved first to Ohio and later to Indiana (Plainfield), Missouri, Kansas, and Indian Territory.

(Submitted on November 26, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Removal History of the Delaware Tribe. (Submitted on November 26, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 26, 2022. It was originally submitted on November 26, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 312 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 26, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Apr. 17, 2024