Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Summerville in Dorchester County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Newington Plantation

 
 
Newington Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, September 19, 2009
1. Newington Plantation Marker
Inscription.  Newington Plantation was established on this site in the 1680s after Daniel Axtell recieved a royal grant of 300 acres. Axtell died shortly after arriving in the colony and his widow Rebecca built a house on the grant by the 1690s. In 1711 Lady Axtell gave Newington, named after the family plantation in England, to her daughter Elizabeth, the widow of Gov. Joseph Blake. Mrs. Blake's son Col. Joseph Blake (1700-1751) inherited

(Reverse text)
the plantation at her death in 1726 and built a large brick house on this site, one which was noted for its many windows, brick out- buildings, and rare double- row avenue of live oaks. Newington remained in the family until it was sold to Henry A. Middleton in 1837. The house burned in 1845 and was in ruins by 1876, when Middleton leased Newington Plantation to the United States government for use as an experimental tea farm.
 
Erected 1997 by Newington Plantation Estates Association. (Marker Number 18-6.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1711.
 
Location.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
32° 58.993′ N, 80° 12.277′ W. Marker is in Summerville, South Carolina, in Dorchester County. Marker is on Plantation Circle, on the left. Located between Whitehall Road & Plantation Drive. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Summerville SC 29483, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old White Meeting House and Cemetery (approx. 1.3 miles away); Stallsville (approx. 1.4 miles away); Pinehurst Tea Farm (approx. 1˝ miles away); Bacon's Bridge / "The Hill" (approx. 1.7 miles away); Pine Forest Inn (approx. 2 miles away); The Old Town Hall (approx. 2.2 miles away); Summerville Memorial Stadium (approx. 2.3 miles away); Coach John McKissick and his wife, Joan (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Summerville.
 
Regarding Newington Plantation. In the 1970s – The plantation lands were developed into a residential subdivision. Marker is located inside the park area of the traffic circle.
 
Also see . . .  Tea production in the United States. The US Government planted an experimental farm outside Summerville, South Carolina. They ran the program from 1884 until 1888. They concluded that South Carolina's climate was too unstable to sustain the tea crop. The Department of Agriculture issued a report
Newington Plantation Marker reverse side image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, September 19, 2009
2. Newington Plantation Marker reverse side
in 1897 that "estimates the minimum cost about eight times as much to pick one pound of tea in South Carolina as that paid for the same service in Asia." (Submitted on October 7, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Newington Plantation Marker as seen in the park at Plantation Circle image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, September 19, 2009
3. Newington Plantation Marker as seen in the park at Plantation Circle
Newington Plantation , King Charles II Grant, 1680 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, September 19, 2009
4. Newington Plantation , King Charles II Grant, 1680
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 15, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 7, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,284 times since then and 1,079 times this year. Last updated on October 17, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 7, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=23362

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 23, 2024