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Waukesha in Waukesha County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
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Waukesha Engine Division

 
 
Waukesha Engine Division Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Linda Hansen, 2009
1. Waukesha Engine Division Marker
Inscription.  
The “Motor Works” pioneered the use of engines to power tractors, cars, trucks, & boats. Later Waukesha Motor Company introduced industrial engines to power compressors, pumps, construction machinery, oilfield drilling, & other industrial applications. Today Waukesha Engine is a worldwide leader in manufacturing gaseous-fueled engines for gas compression, mechanical drive, and power generation applications.

Harold L. Horning, Fred Ahrens, and Allan Stebbins founded the Waukesha Motor Company in 1906 in the Blue Front Garage on North Street. The company prospered & by 1910 moved into a larger facility built on St. Paul Avenue.

Waukesha Motor Company signed a merger agreement with Bangor Punta Corporation in 1968. In 1974, Dresser Industries acquired the company and the name was changed to Waukesha Engine Division. In 1998, the company became Waukesha Engine Division, a part of the Dresser Equipment Group in the Halliburton Company.
 
Erected 2000 by Waukesha County Historical Society. (Marker Number 34-16.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list:
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Industry & Commerce. A significant historical year for this entry is 1906.
 
Location. Marker has been permanently removed. It was located near 43° 0.441′ N, 88° 14.6′ W. Marker was in Waukesha, Wisconsin, in Waukesha County. Marker was at the intersection of North Prairie Avenue and West St. Paul Avenue, on the right when traveling south on North Prairie Avenue. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 822 W St Paul Ave, Waukesha WI 53188, United States of America.

We have been informed that this sign or monument is no longer there and will not be replaced. This page is an archival view of what was.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. INNIO Group's Waukesha Engine (here, next to this marker); Dunbar Oak (approx. 0.2 miles away); Acme Spring (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lindholm Vocational & Adult School (approx. half a mile away); Old Cutler Home (approx. half a mile away); Prehistoric Indian Mound (approx. half a mile away); Waukesha City - Cutler Park (approx. half a mile away); Milwaukee and Madison Railway Depot (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waukesha.
 
Also see . . .
Waukesha Engine Division image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Linda Hansen, 2009
2. Waukesha Engine Division
 The Waukesha Engine Historical Society. Site has many photos of engines, people and the plant over the years, viewable through a photo tour of our museum. Included in the lobby tour is a Historical Marker given to Waukesha Engine by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers for developing the device for determining Octane for fuels in 1928. These devices are still being used today. (Submitted on June 23, 2011, by Dennis Tollefson of Waukesha, Wisconsin.) 
 
Additional commentary.
1. History of Waukesha Engine
The company today known as Waukesha Engine was known locally as the "Motor Works" for many years. The company was originally formed in 1906 by Harold Horning, Fred Ahrens, and Allan Stebbins at the Blue Front Garage at 139 E. North Street (the building still exists). In 1910 they moved to their current location on St. Paul Ave. The first full-size engine, a replacement for steam engines for the construction equipment industry, was developed in 1912. World War I brought the first standard gasoline truck engine for military vehicles. In the 1920s oil drilling equipment was produced along with laboratory test engines. As the company grew, so did the city. At one time 20% of the city depended directly or indirectly on the company.

During
Waukesha Engine Division image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Linda Hansen, 2011
3. Waukesha Engine Division
World War II the plant was open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week because of the high demand for their products. They built an F817 gasoline engine which was used in tank retrievers and trucks and an ICK used in portable generators. The highest employee numbers were during WWII at 2,000, most of which were women. Barracks were built across the street as a convenience to house the workers since they were working every day.

Between 1968 and 1974 the company was acquired by conglomerate Bangor Punta Operations, Inc. Eventually it became too expensive for Bangor Punta to keep the plant current and growing in order to compete in the marketplace. They then sold the company to Dresser Industries. The Waukesha Engine Historical Society was formed in 1992 to house its many photos and memorabilia from its many successful years of operation.

In 1998, the company was known as Waukesha Engine Division, Dresser Equipment Group, a Halliburton Company. Today they are the worldwide leader in manufactured gas-fueled engines for gas compression, mechanical drive, and power generation applications.
    — Submitted June 10, 2011, by Linda Hansen of Waukesha, Wisconsin.
 
Waukesha Engine Division image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Linda Hansen, 2011
4. Waukesha Engine Division
Waukesha Engine Division image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Linda Hansen, 2011
5. Waukesha Engine Division
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 1, 2024. It was originally submitted on June 10, 2011, by Linda Hansen of Waukesha, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 3,387 times since then and 207 times this year. Last updated on May 31, 2024, by Linda Hansen of Waukesha, Wisconsin. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 10, 2011, by Linda Hansen of Waukesha, Wisconsin.   3, 4, 5. submitted on June 15, 2011, by Linda Hansen of Waukesha, Wisconsin. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 14, 2024