Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Griswoldville in Jones County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Griswoldville

 
 
Griswoldville Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 7, 2009
1. Griswoldville Marker
Inscription.  This town is named for Samuel Griswold who moved his iron foundries and cotton gin factories here from Clinton to be on the railroad. A disastrous unrecorded battle was fought here in 1864 when a force of old men and youths under Gen. Phillips, Capt. Robert H. Barron & Lt. Henry Greaves, sent from Macon by Gen. Howell Cobb in an attempt to force the Federals from the city, fought a bloody diversionary action against Kilpatrick’s Union Cavalry which then proceeded to Irwinton. Griswold’s factories and property were destroyed because he had made arms and ammunition for the Confederacy.
 
Erected 1954 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 084-4.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Georgia Historical Society series list.
 
Location. 32° 52.277′ N, 83° 29.323′ W. Marker is in Griswoldville, Georgia
Marker was removed, new roadside pull-off created and marker reoriented parallel to road. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 29, 2017
2. Marker was removed, new roadside pull-off created and marker reoriented parallel to road.
, in Jones County. Marker is at the intersection of Henderson Road and Griswoldville Road, on the right when traveling north on Henderson Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Macon GA 31217, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Confederate Pistol Factory (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Griswoldville The Advance from East Macon (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Griswoldville (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Griswoldville (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Griswoldville The Deployment and Assaults (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Cavalry Skirmish (approx. 1.1 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Griswoldville (approx. 1.4 miles away); Target Griswoldville (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Griswoldville.
 
Regarding Griswoldville. Virtually nothing remains of the town of Griswoldville.
 
Griswoldville Marker recently reinstalled in different order and orientation. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 29, 2017
3. Griswoldville Marker recently reinstalled in different order and orientation.
This marker is now on far left. A new roadside pull-off has been built to allow viewing of these 4 markers.
Griswoldville Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 7, 2009
4. Griswoldville Marker
The marker is to the left (of the two markers). The Griswold saw mill and gin stood here; the mill pond remains a short distance behind these trees.
Griswoldville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 7, 2016
5. Griswoldville Marker
Marker missing from this location
Griswoldville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 7, 2016
6. Griswoldville Marker
Marker currently missing from this location.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 31, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 6, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,159 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 6, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on May 1, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   4. submitted on December 6, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   5, 6. submitted on October 12, 2016, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement