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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Waverly in Pike County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
REMOVED
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The Emmitt House / James Emmitt

 
 
The Emmitt House Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2009
1. The Emmitt House Marker (Side A)
Inscription.  
Side A: The Emmitt House
Built for Waverly industrialist James Emmitt in 1861, The Emmitt House was partly the work of carpenter Madison Hemings, who claimed parentage by President Thomas Jefferson. It served as a tavern and store for travelers on the Ohio-Erie Canal that passed directly in front of the hotel. The Emmitt House was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978 as a key part of the Waverly Canal District, which encompasses many of the canal-era residential and commercial buildings in the downtown area. It underwent a year-long restoration project in 1989 that retained its historical flavor and design. It continues to provide hospitality to both residents and travelers.

Side B: James Emmitt (1806-1893)
The son of German and Irish immigrants who settled here in 1816, James Emmitt was a prominent figure in the economic growth of Waverly and the lower Scioto valley for much of the 19th century. After the Ohio-Erie Canal opened in 1832, Emmitt prospered by shipping grain to Cleveland, and the early success of his distilleries in Waverly and Chillicothe led to far-reaching business interests.
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Using his political influence, he successfully campaigned to move the county seat from Piketon to Waverly in 1860, building the courthouse, a road between Waverly and Piketon, and a bridge over the Scioto River with his own money. Emmitt served in the Ohio Senate from 1867 to 1870. His home stands three blocks north.
 
Erected 2000 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Longaberger Company, The Pike County Convention and Visitors Bureau, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 4-66.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Charity & Public WorkIndustry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1861.
 
Location. Marker has been permanently removed. It was located near 39° 7.607′ N, 82° 59.113′ W. Marker was in Waverly, Ohio, in Pike County. Marker was at the intersection of Market Street (Ohio Route 220) and Emmitt Avenue (U.S. 23), on the right when traveling south on Market Street. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 123 N Market Street, Waverly OH 45690, United States of America.

We have been informed that this sign or monument is no longer there and will not be replaced.
James Emmitt Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2009
2. James Emmitt Marker (Side B)
This page is an archival view of what was.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Historic Emmitt House (a few steps from this marker); Pike County Courthouse (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); War Savings Stamps (about 400 feet away); German Evangelical Church / Pike Heritage Foundation Museum (about 500 feet away); Waverly Fire Bell (about 700 feet away); Canal Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pike County Twentieth-Century War Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pike County Revolutionary Soldiers (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waverly.
 
More about this marker. Marker is listed on the historical society's official list as number 3-66, and it indicates that it has been permanently removed.
 
Additional commentary.
1.
The Emmitt House and the this Ohio Marker no longer exist. The House was destroyed by a fire in 2014. Several newpapers covered the story and can be found online.
    — Submitted February 22, 2016, by Melanie Born of Parma, Ohio.
 
The Emmitt House and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2009
3. The Emmitt House and Marker
Looking south across Emmitt Avenue (US 23).
The Emmitt House and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2009
4. The Emmitt House and Marker
Cast Iron Support on the Emmitt House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2009
5. Cast Iron Support on the Emmitt House
Cast Iron Detail on the Emmitt House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2009
6. Cast Iron Detail on the Emmitt House
"Geo. L. Mesker & Co. Iron Works, Evansville, Ind."
Cast Iron Design on the Emmitt House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2009
7. Cast Iron Design on the Emmitt House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 2, 2019. It was originally submitted on December 10, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,946 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on December 10, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

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Mar. 1, 2024