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Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Armistead

 
 
Armistead Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 16, 2007
1. Armistead Marker
Inscription.  To Col. George Armistead, April 10, 1779 – April 25, 1818, commander of this fort during the bombardment by the British Fleet, Sept. 13-14 1814. War of 1812.

Erected Spet. 12, 1914 by the City of Baltimore, Soc. War of 1812 contributing. In commemoration of the gallant defense of Fort McHenry under the command of Col. George Armistead, which was the inspiration of the National Anthem, The Star-Spangled Banner.
 
Erected 1914 by the City of Baltimore and the Society of the War of 1812.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: War of 1812Waterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Maryland, Fort McHenry series list.
 
Location. 39° 15.867′ N, 76° 34.8′ W. Marker is in Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker can be reached from Fort Avenue. Statue is on the fort grounds adjacent to the Visitor Center. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21230, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Welcome! You Are Now "On Post" (within shouting distance of
Erected Sept. 12 1914 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 13, 2012
2. Erected Sept. 12 1914
By
The City of Baltimore
Soc of War of 1812 Contributing
in Commemoration of the Gallant
Defense of Fort McHenry
Col. George Armistead
Which was the Inspiration of the
National Anthem
The Star-Spangled Banner
this marker); Evolution of Fort McHenry (within shouting distance of this marker); Heritage of Courage...The Society of the War of 1812 (within shouting distance of this marker); Preservation of Earthworks (within shouting distance of this marker); Allegiance by Force (within shouting distance of this marker); Another Day on Duty... 1814 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); O'er the Ramparts We Watch! (about 300 feet away); A Star Spangled Centennial (about 400 feet away); British Bomb (about 400 feet away); Fort McHenry (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort McHenry.
 
Regarding Armistead. “During the War of 1812, Col. George Armistead (1779–1818) was in command of Fort McHenry when Maryland was invaded by the British on September 13 and 14, 1814. For twenty-five hours, Armistead and his men endured a heavy bombardment from the British. During the bombardment, Francis Scott Key was held on one of the enemy’s ships, where he had gone on an official mission. It was on the ship’s deck that he
To<br>George Armistead image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 13, 2012
3. To
George Armistead
April 10 1779       April 25 1818
Commander of this Fort
During the Bombardment
By the British Fleet
Sept 13-14 1814 War of 1812
composed the verses of the ‘Star Spangled Banner.’ ” —from the Smithsonian Institution Research Information System.
 
Colonel George Armistead (1779–1818) image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 16, 2007
4. Colonel George Armistead (1779–1818)
Bronze by Edward Berge (1876–1924) is 8 feet tall on a 13½ foot granite base.
Full view of Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 16, 2007
5. Full view of Monument
A much older monument dedicated to Col. Armistead is located at Federal Hill. See Col. Geo. Armistead.
Armistead image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 13, 2012
6. Armistead
Armistead image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 13, 2012
7. Armistead
George Armistead image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
8. George Armistead
This 1818 painting of George Armistead by Rembrandt Peale hangs in the Maryland Historical Society Museum in Baltimore, Maryland.

“George Armistead is most often remembered for commissioning Mary Pickersgill to make ‘a flag so large… the British would have no difficulty seeing from a distance’ and flying that forty-two-by-thirty-foot flag over Fort McHenry during the twenty-five hour bombardment in September 1814. Francis Scott Key immortalized the flag in his verses about the ‘star-spangled banner.’ As commander of the fort on that fateful day, Armistead and his men held the British Navy at bay and earned a celebrated position among the city's defenders.” — Maryland Historical Society
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 19, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 3,196 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 19, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   2, 3. submitted on July 12, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4, 5. submitted on September 19, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   6, 7. submitted on July 12, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on September 29, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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