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Hutto in Williamson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Shiloh-McCutcheon Cemetery

 
 
Shiloh-McCutcheon Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Keith Peterson, December 27, 2009
1. Shiloh-McCutcheon Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  

The community of Shiloh dates from 1848, when both Nelson Morey and Josiah Taylor established stores in this area. Shiloh spread along the banks of Brushy Creek near Wilbarger Crossing, which was later called Shiloh Crossing and Rogan Crossing. The community consisted of a school, a church, two stores and a few residents who lived along Brushy Creek.

Shiloh-McCutcheon Cemetery sits on part of the original grant of 1852 acres issued to the heirs of William Gatlin because of his participation in the Texas Army during the revolution of 1835-1836. The first recorded burial is that of Josiah Kuykendall, who became ill with smallpox after a traveler spent the night at his home. His brother and neighbor, Mark Kuykendall, came to care for Josiah during his illness, but became ill himself. Both brothers died from the disease and were buried in the cemetery in 1853.

The property was not officially deeded as a cemetery until February 1890, when William McCutcheon deeded land to three cemetery trustees, F.F. Farley, Green Randolf, and William Rogan. William McCutcheon, his wife Elizabeth Jane, and six of their thirteen children
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are buried here. Through the years, the burial ground has also been known as Shiloh, Old Shiloh, or McCutcheon Cemetery. Burials at the site include veterans of the Texas Revolution, Civil War, World War I and World War II. Due to the density of burials, interments are now restricted to the ashes of descendants of those already interred at the site.

Historic Texas Cemetery
 
Erected 1999 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15934.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Cemeteries & Burial Sites. A significant historical year for this entry is 1848.
 
Location. 30° 30.133′ N, 97° 32.112′ W. Marker is in Hutto, Texas, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from County Road 163. Cemetery is located on CR-163. This road is gated at FM-1660. Go through the gate and follow CR-163, it will end at the cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hutto TX 78634, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Saul Cemetery (approx. 1.4 miles away); Hutto Cemetery (approx. 1˝ miles away); Hutto Lutheran Cemetery (approx. 1.9 miles away); M.B. Norman House (approx. 2.2 miles away); Norman's Crossing (approx. 2.3 miles away); Kimbro Family Cemetery
Shiloh-McCutcheon Cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Keith Peterson, December 27, 2009
2. Shiloh-McCutcheon Cemetery
(approx. 2˝ miles away); Klattenhoff House (approx. 2.6 miles away); Hutto (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hutto.
 
William and Elizabeth Jane McCutcheon Gravestone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Keith Peterson, December 27, 2009
3. William and Elizabeth Jane McCutcheon Gravestone
Mark Kuykendall Gravestone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Keith Peterson, December 27, 2009
4. Mark Kuykendall Gravestone
Josiah Kuykendall Gravestone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Keith Peterson, December 27, 2009
5. Josiah Kuykendall Gravestone
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 28, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 1,556 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 28, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 17, 2024