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Camden in Kershaw County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Gaol

 
 
Goal Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 11, 2009
1. Goal Marker
Inscription.  On this corner stood the gaol, built in 1771 and burned in 1812. During the Revolution the British imprisoned in it many American soldiers and civilians. Among them, after his capture near the Waxhaws, was the boy Andrew Jackson, later seventh President. He is said to have watched the Battle of Hobkirk Hill through a hole he cut in the wall of the gaol's second story.
 
Erected 1958 by Kershaw County Historical Society and the City of Camden. (Marker Number 28-5.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Settlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #07 Andrew Jackson series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1771.
 
Location. 34° 14.364′ N, 80° 36.378′ W. Marker is in Camden, South Carolina, in Kershaw County. Marker is on Broad Street (State Highway 521), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Camden SC 29020, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Old Jail and Town Market (here, next to this marker); The Robert Mills Courthouse
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(within shouting distance of this marker); Old Camden Courthouse and Gaol (within shouting distance of this marker); The Price House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Colonel Joseph Kershaw's Tomb (approx. 0.2 miles away); The First Town Square (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nothwest Redoubt (approx. 0.3 miles away); Northwest Redoubt (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Camden.
 
Goal Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 11, 2009
2. Goal Marker
Robert Mills Courthouse (now Chamber of Commerce) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cindy Bullard, February 16, 2010
3. Robert Mills Courthouse (now Chamber of Commerce)
Designed in 1825 by "South Carolina's Architect", Robert Mills and completed in 1827, the courthouse features a copper roof, brick floors, vaulted central hallway, double arched ceilings downstairs, and vestiges of its original radiant heat systems. Built to be fireproof, the walls of the structure are 22-inch thick masonry at the base covered by plaster, tapering to about fifteen inches thick at the second floor. The courtroom is restored to conform to an 1845 renovation, when wide pine plank floors were installed to cover the second story brick floor. The judge's bench and witness stand are as Mills designed them. The original ornate woodwork is visible above period silk and damask window treatments.
Robert Mills Courthouse (Camden Courthouse) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Melissa Roberts, May 2, 2010
4. Robert Mills Courthouse (Camden Courthouse)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on October 17, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 956 times since then and 38 times this year. Last updated on February 17, 2010, by David Bullard of Seneca, South Carolina. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 17, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   3. submitted on February 17, 2010, by David Bullard of Seneca, South Carolina.   4. submitted on December 20, 2011, by Melissa Roberts of Barnwell, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 18, 2024