Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Goldsboro in Wayne County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Goldsboro Bridge

End of Fosterís Raid

ó Fosterís Raid ó

 
 
Battle of Goldsboro Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
1. Battle of Goldsboro Bridge Marker
Inscription.  (Preface):
Late in 1862. Union Gen. John G. Fosterís garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New Bern to burn the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Bridge over the Reuse River at Goldsboro and to demonstrate in support of Gen. Ambrose E. Burnsideís attack at Fredericksburg, Virginia. Fosterís force consisted of 10,000 infantry, 640 cavalry, and 40 cannons.

The Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Bridge stood one-half mile to your front, three miles from Goldsboro. Supplies transported by rail from the port at Wilmington had to cross the bridge on the way to the Army of Northern Virginia, making the bridge and the city of Goldsboro vital links in the Confederate supply chain. Fosterís command reached this area on the morning of December 17, after engagements at Kinston and Whitehall.

A small Confederate force under Generals Gustavus
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
W. Smith, Thomas L. Clingman, and Nathan G. Evans defended the bridge. Fosterís men attacked from the other side of the railroad to your right and, after pushing back the Confederates, succeeded in setting the bridge on fire. The Federal artillery then bombarded the burning structure to prevent the Confederates from extinguishing the blaze, while infantrymen destroyed the railroad tracks atop the embankment to your right.

Late that afternoon, as Foster marched back to New Bern, Confederate forces crossed these fields and attacked the Federal rear guard on the other side of the railroad to your right, but were repulsed by a heavy fire of small arms and artillery. The Confederates suffered about 150 killed, wounded, and missing during the battle, while Union losses were fewer than 100. The Confederates repaired the bridge within a few weeks.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical month for this entry is December 1860.
 
Location. 35° 
Battle of Goldsboro Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
2. Battle of Goldsboro Bridge Marker
20.378′ N, 78° 1.717′ W. Marker is near Goldsboro, North Carolina, in Wayne County. Marker is on Old Mt. Olive Highway just south of U.S. 117, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Goldsboro NC 27530, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Goldsborough Bridge (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Counterattack (about 700 feet away); Attack of the 17th Massachusetts (approx. 0.2 miles away); Union Assault on the Bridge (approx. ľ mile away); Waynesborough (approx. 2.6 miles away); General Baptist State Convention (approx. 3.2 miles away); Gertrude Weil (approx. 3.4 miles away); First Pentecostal Holiness Church Congregation (approx. 3Ĺ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Goldsboro.
 
More about this marker. This is Stop No. 1 of the four stops on the battlefield walking tour.

Marker has a Harperís Weekly illustration of the battle on the lower left; portraits of Generals Foster, Clingman and Evans in the lower center; and two maps on the right side, one of General Fosterís route from
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
3. Detail from the Marker
“Approximate route of General John G. Fosterís raid from New Bern to Goldsboro, December 1862.”
New Bern and the other of the engagement here.

Marker is at the Goldsborough Bridge Battlefield, in the parking area. The Goldsborough Bridge Battlefield is owned by Wayne County and developed and operated by the volunteer group the Goldsborough Bridge Battlefield Association. Follow the first link below for more information.

The Google satellite view available on the “click for map” link above in the Location Section (then click on the Satellite button in the upper right) provides a detailed view of the battlefield and the current railroad bridge.
 
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
4. Detail from the Marker
“Engagement at Goldsboro Bridge”
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
5. Detail from the Marker
“ ĎSkirmish Near Golsbroro,í Harperís Weekly
Detail from the Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
6. Detail from the Marker
Portraits of Generals John G. Foster (Union), Thomas L. Clingman and Nathan G. Evans (Confederate).
Todayís Railroad Bridge over the Neuse River image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
7. Todayís Railroad Bridge over the Neuse River
View is from the south bank. This railroad line today belongs to CSX Transportation. From 1900 to 1967 it was part of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on March 7, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 2,567 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on March 7, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=28291

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 16, 2024