Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Jose in Santa Clara County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

International Business Machines : RAMAC

 
 
Main Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2010
1. Main Marker
Inscription.  
[ Main Marker: ]
International Business Machines : RAMAC
In 1952, IBM sent Reynold Johnson to San José to open its first West Coast development laboratory to research new data storage methods. At this site in 1955, IBM unveiled RAMAC (Random Access Method of Accounting and Control), the world’s first system for storing computer data on magnetic disks. This technology is the basis for many of today’s computer applications. In 1984, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers named RAMAC an International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark. In 1986, Rey Johnson received the National Medal of Technology from President Reagan.

[ Second Marker: ]
IBM 350 Random Access Method of Accounting and Control (RAMAC)
International Historic
Mechanical Engineering Landmark
1956 – San Jose, California
The IBM 350 disk drive storage development pioneered the breakthrough to on-line computer systems by providing the first storage device with random access to large volumes of data. It has become the primary computer bulk-storage
Second Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2010
2. Second Marker
Click or scan to see
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medium, displacing punched cards and magnetic tapes and making possible the use of the computer in such areas as airline reservations, automated banking, medical diagnosis, and space flights. Disk storage is now the primary means of storing database information on-line for computers.

Development of the disk drive was pioneered by a small group of IBM Engineers in San Jose.

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers – 1984
 
Erected by City of San Jose.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #40 Ronald Reagan, and the Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmarks series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1952.
 
Location. 37° 20.154′ N, 121° 53.746′ W. Marker is in San Jose, California, in Santa Clara County. Marker is on Notre Dame Avenue near West St. John Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 94 Notre Dame Avenue, San Jose CA 95113, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Luis María Peralta Adobe (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Palomar Ballroom (about 400 feet away); Thomas Fallon House (about 400 feet away); The Juan Bautista de Anza Trail (about 500
Main Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2010
3. Main Marker
Marker is mounted on a pole on the sidewalk in front of the building.
feet away); Hotel De Anza (about 600 feet away); College of Notre Dame (about 600 feet away); Captain Thomas Fallon (about 600 feet away); Pellier Park (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Jose.
 
Also see . . .
1. "Rey Johnson: A Full life, A Fuller Future”. An article by William D. Blankenship, published on pp. 40-41 of the June 1971 edition of Think, the IBM employee publication. (Submitted on April 25, 2010.) 

2. Biography of Reynold Johnson. Lemelson-MIT website entry:
In late 1955, Johnson and his team presented the first-ever working hard drive to IBM management. The RAMAC (Random Access Method of Accounting Control) was very large, weighing in at one ton. (Submitted on April 25, 2010.) 
 
Additional keywords. Technology
 
Second Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2010
4. Second Marker
Marker is mounted on the building to the left of the entrance.
The IBM Building image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Syd Whittle, April 25, 2010
5. The IBM Building
Both markers are seen in this view of the building.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 30, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 25, 2010, by Syd Whittle of Mesa, Arizona. This page has been viewed 1,317 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 25, 2010, by Syd Whittle of Mesa, Arizona.

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Jul. 4, 2022