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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Milwaukee in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Birthplace of the American League

 
 
Birthplace of the American League Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul F, January 1, 2008
1. Birthplace of the American League Marker
Inscription.  The Republican House, a hotel that stood on this site from 1886 to 1961, was the birthplace of baseball’s American League. On the night of March 5, 1900, Milwaukee attorney Henry Killilea, his brother Matt, Connie Mack, Byron (Ban) Johnson, and Charles Comiskey gathered in Room 185. In defiance of the existing National League, Comiskey’s Chicago White Stockings (later Sox) were incorporated, and the league's eight team alignment was completed. After the 1900 season, the league reorganized, placed teams in Baltimore, Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C., and acheived major league status.
 
Erected 2000 by Society for American Baseball Research, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and The Milwaukee County Historical Society. This marker was dedicated in the centennial year of Major League Baseball’s Junior Circuit.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Sports.
 
Location. 43° 2.512′ N, 87° 54.879′ W. Marker is in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in Milwaukee County. Marker is at the intersection of North Old
Birthplace of the American League Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul F, May 3, 2010
2. Birthplace of the American League Marker
Looking northwest across N. Old World 3rd Street. Marker is on the first post from the right.
World 3rd Street and West Kilbourn Avenue, on the right when traveling south on North Old World 3rd Street. Located on the northwest corner on the fourth fence post from the corner. Fence encloses a parking lot of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Milwaukee WI 53203, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pere Jacques Marquette, S.J. (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Pere Jacques Marquette, S.J. (within shouting distance of this marker); Father Marquette's Camp - 1674 (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Site in Journalism (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pere Marquette Historic Site (about 300 feet away); First African-American Church Built in Wisconsin (about 400 feet away); Connie Carpenter (Phinney) (about 400 feet away); Andy North (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Milwaukee.
 
Also see . . .  The History of the American and National League. 2008 article by Peter Bendix on Beyond the Box Score. “When the NL reduced its teams, a minor league called the Western League saw an opportunity. In 1899, Bancroft Johnson, commissioner of the Western League, renamed his league the American League. In 1901—the year after the NL contracted four teams—the American League removed itself from the National Agreement
Old Postcard of Republican House Hotel image. Click for full size.
3. Old Postcard of Republican House Hotel
(the understanding between the National League and the various minor league circuits) and declared itself to be a Major League, alongside the National League. They also expanded, placing teams into three of the four cities that had lost their NL team—Baltimore, Cleveland, and Washington—as well as placing some teams into cities that already had an NL team – Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia. The original American League consisted of the following teams: Baltimore Orioles, Boston Americans, Chicago White Stockings, Cleveland Blues, Detroit Tigers, Milwaukee Brewers, Philadelphia Athletics, and Washington Senators.

The National League was furious. They tried to push aside the upstart AL and regain their profitable monopoly. However, it soon became apparent that the AL wasn’t going anywhere, and, in true American fashion, the NL realized that if they couldn’t beat the AL, they should join them. In 1903 the two leagues signed a new version of the National Agreement, under which they agreed that they would each be a major league, and their champions would play each other in the World Series (a fantastic marketing and profit opportunity for the two leagues).” (Submitted on May 6, 2010.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on May 4, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 2,637 times since then and 221 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 4, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin.   3. submitted on May 25, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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Nov. 27, 2020