Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Mayfield in Fulton County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Indian Raid

 
 
Indian Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, July 8, 2010
1. Indian Raid Marker
Inscription.  Jacob Dunham and Samuel, his son, killed here April 1779. Others of the family escaped by hiding in the woods. Site of their home.
 
Erected 1938 by New York State Education Department.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansWar, US Revolutionary.
 
Location. 43° 7.075′ N, 74° 15.383′ W. Marker is in Mayfield, New York, in Fulton County. Marker is at the intersection of Paradise Point Road and Furguson Road, on the right when traveling east on Paradise Point Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 149 Paradise Point Road, Mayfield NY 12117, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Dutch Reformed Church of Mayfield (approx. 1.1 miles away); Burying Ground (approx. 1.4 miles away); Romeyn's Mill (approx. 1.4 miles away); Rice Homestead (approx. 1.6 miles away); a different marker also named Burying Ground (approx. 2 miles away); Riceville Cemetery
Indian Raid Marker beside Diamond Point Road image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, July 8, 2010
2. Indian Raid Marker beside Diamond Point Road
(approx. 2.1 miles away); Captain Solomon Woodworth (approx. 2.1 miles away); Amasa Stephen (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mayfield.
 
Regarding Indian Raid. Legend has it that the Indians decapitated Jacob Dunham's head and placed it on the horns of the family cow and sent it home, where to the horror of his remaining family, it was discovered.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2019. It was originally submitted on July 13, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 781 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 13, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 6, 2020