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Marion in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Rochambeau

 
 
Rochambeau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 21, 2010
1. Rochambeau Marker
Inscription.  
Rochambeau
Lieut. General
Commanding
The Auxiliary French Armies
Under
Washington
July 10, 1780     Jan 11, 1783

Rochambeau's letter to Congress
"We are your brothers. We shall
conduct ourselves as such with you.
We shall fight against our enemies
at your side as one and the same nation"
Quotation from General's letter

[ back ]
General Rochambeau and 6000 French forces under his command camped here in June 1781 They then continued their march through Connecticut to join General Washington and the American troops in successfully defeating the British at the Battle of Yorktown.
The French forces again camped here in Nov 1782 after gallantly helping in our fight for independence.
General Count de Rochambeau was an original member of the Society of the Cincinnati formed by General Washington and his officers in 1783 to perpetuate their fellowship.
Erected and rededicated 1971

 
Erected 1971.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this
Rochambeau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 21, 2010
2. Rochambeau Marker
topic list: War, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the The Washington-Rochambeau Route series list.
 
Location. 41° 34.177′ N, 72° 55.389′ W. Marker is in Marion, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Marion Avenue and Burritt Street, on the right when traveling north on Marion Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Marion CT 06444, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Forever Honored Forever Mourned (approx. ¾ mile away); Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route (approx. 2.2 miles away); Maxwell Noble Drive (approx. 2½ miles away); Dedicated to All Veterans (approx. 2½ miles away); Southington Recreation Park (approx. 2½ miles away); a different marker also named Forever Honored Forever Mourned (approx. 2.7 miles away); Reverend Zygmunt Woroniecki (approx. 2.8 miles away); a different marker also named Forever Honored Forever Mourned (approx. 2.8 miles away).
 
Regarding Rochambeau. Marion is the site of an encampment by the French general, Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau and his troops during the American Revolutionary War. In June 1781, the French troops under Rochambeau's command
Rochambeau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 21, 2010
3. Rochambeau Marker
back
left Farmington and marched 13 miles to their eighth camp through Connecticut, near Asa Barnes's Tavern in the Marion section of Southington. They camped there for four days. Rochambeau and his officers took shelter in the tavern, and the troops set up camp on a hill on the other side of the road. The area of the encampment has since become known as French Hill, and a marker on the west side of Marion Avenue commemorates the French campsite. According to Rev. Timlow's Sketches of Southington (1875), "Landlord Barnes gave a ball at his tavern, at which a large number of the young women of the vicinity were present; and they esteemed it something of an honor to have had a 'cotillion' with the polite foreigner." The celebrations—infused with spirits provided by Landlord Barnes—spanned the four nights they were in Southington. Rochambeau revisited Barnes's Tavern again on the return march on October 27, 1782. According to Timlow's Ecclesiastical and Other Sketches of Southington, Conn., coins, buttons and other things were picked up in the vicinity many years after the two encampments. The Barnes Tavern is now a private residence very near the camp site at 1089 Marion Avenue.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  The Rochambeau Monument at Southington Conn.
Rochambeau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 21, 2010
4. Rochambeau Marker
The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society,. Vol. XII 1913. (Submitted on May 26, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
The Back of the Rochambeau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 21, 2010
5. The Back of the Rochambeau Marker
Rochambeau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 21, 2010
6. Rochambeau Marker
Detail from the Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Marker in Plantsville image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, July 28, 2010
7. Detail from the Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Marker in Plantsville
In 1912, the American Irish Historical Society erected a monument at "French Hill" in Marion to mark the area where comte de Rochambeau's army had camped in 1781 and again in 1782 after the combined American and French victory at Yorktown.
Photograph provided by Andrea Triano-LaChapelle

(see the related marker)
Rochambeau Monument image. Click for full size.
Charles Fenno Jacobs (courtesy of the Library of Congress), May 23, 1942
8. Rochambeau Monument
“Southington, Connecticut. Monument paying tribute to Count de Rochambeau and other Frenchmen who under Lafayette aided the American colonies in their fight for independence. The site of the monument is French Hill, where Rochambeau's army encamped in 1781. The tablet, inscribed with the general's message to Washington, is on the monument site.” Photo by Fenno Jacobs

Rochambeau's
Address to
Washington
I am the friend of your friends
and the foe of your foes
I shall serve with all my
ability henceforth under the
command of Your Excellency

1861--1865
Capt. Samuel S. Woodruff 20th C.V.
Lieut. Charles Clark 20th C.V.
Lieut. Andrew Barnes 20th C.V.
James V Johnson, 20th C.V.
William James 20th C.V.
Charles H. Johnson, 20th C.V.
Stephen Walkley, 7th C.V.
Charles D. Barnes 15th C.V.
Thomas R. Walker, 16th C.V.
Dwight Lewis, 20th C.V.
William Eagan, 9th C.V.
Peter Walsh, 9th C.V.
Bust of Rochambeau<br>by James E. Kelly, 1912 image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
9. Bust of Rochambeau
by James E. Kelly, 1912
Photo appeared in The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society, Vol. XII, 1913.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 8, 2019. It was originally submitted on July 28, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 1,530 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 28, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   7. submitted on July 30, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   8, 9. submitted on May 26, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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