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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Coshocton in Coshocton County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

William’s Tavern

 
 
William's Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Phyllis Prats, May 6, 2006
1. William's Tavern Marker
Inscription.  On this site stood the Tavern of Charles "King Charley" Williams, first permanent white settler in Coshocton County. A native of Maryland, and born in 1764, Williams came here in 1801. He died in 1840. The dominant figure of his generation, he was military leader, tavern keeper, judge, sheriff and member of the state legislature. His house was the community center—tavern, courthouse, ballroom, even church. History relates that Louis Phillipe, later King Louis XIII of France was, because of his boisterousness, bodily kicked out of the tavern by "King Charley." The long log building, which faced the river, burned in 1889.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 40° 16.524′ N, 81° 52.283′ W. Marker is in Coshocton, Ohio, in Coshocton County. Marker is on Chestnut Street (Ohio Route 541) west of North Water Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Coshocton OH 43812, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Delaware Nation Council House (approx. 0.2 miles away);
William's Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Phyllis Prats, May 6, 2006
2. William's Tavern Marker
The Coshocton County Courthouse (approx. ¼ mile away); Raymond M. Hay (approx. 0.3 miles away); Coshocton County Vietnam War Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Coshocton.
 
Also see . . .  History of Coshocton County, Its Past and Present. Scroll down to page 413 to read about Charles William in this transcription of the 1881 book compiled by N. N. Hill, Jr. (Submitted on May 10, 2006.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 29, 2019. It was originally submitted on May 10, 2006, by Phyllis Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,926 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 10, 2006, by Phyllis Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 21, 2021