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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Strasburg in Shenandoah County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Field Fortifications

 
 
Field Fortifications Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
1. Field Fortifications Marker
Inscription.  Those earthworks were built in October 1864 by the 2nd Division, VIth U.S. Corps under the supervision of its adjutant general, Capt. Hazard Stevens. The crescent shaped positions, called "lunettes" because of their resemblance to a new moon, were built to protect an artillery piece and its crew. The three guns placed here composed half a battery and were designated a "section." An infantry trench line extended eastward.

The devastating effect of Civil War weapons made the use of field fortifications routine by 1864. They provided protection to defenders while increasing problems for the attacker. Construction was conducted within procedures developed at West Point prior to the war and was fully standard on both sides.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is October 1864.
 
Location. 39° 0.033′ N, 78° 20.973′ W. Marker is near Strasburg, Virginia, in Shenandoah County. Marker can be reached from Valley Pike (U.S. 11) 0.1 miles west of Signal Knob Drive, on the right when traveling south. Located just off the parking lot for the Stonewall
Field Fortifications Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, October 31, 2020
2. Field Fortifications Marker
The marker has weathered significantly.
Click or scan to see
this page online
Jackson Headquarters Museum / Crystal Caverns. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 33229 Old Valley Pike, Strasburg VA 22657, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Shenandoah Valley / Battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864 (here, next to this marker); Trail Head (here, next to this marker); Hupp’s Hill (a few steps from this marker); A Natural Bombproof (within shouting distance of this marker); Signal Knob (within shouting distance of this marker); Strasburg (within shouting distance of this marker); Hupp's "Little Gem" (within shouting distance of this marker); Crystal Caverns Mine (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Strasburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays a drawing of a Civil War cannon and a topographical map of the positioned described.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Cedar Creek Staff Ride. The Museum is tour stop one on the Center of Military History staff ride of the Battle of Cedar Creek. (Submitted on November 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Marker along the Walking Trail image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
3. Marker along the Walking Trail
A short walking trail from the parking lot loops through several earthwork structures.
Field Fortifications Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, October 31, 2020
4. Field Fortifications Marker
One of the Artillery Positions on the Hill image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
5. One of the Artillery Positions on the Hill
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 1, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,367 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on November 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3. submitted on November 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on November 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   5. submitted on November 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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Jun. 29, 2022