Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Boca Chica in Cameron County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Battle of Palmito Ranch

 
 
Battle of Palmito Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 10, 2010
1. Battle of Palmito Ranch Marker
Inscription.  The last land engagement of the Civil War was fought near this site on May 12-13, 1865, thirty-four days after Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox.

Col. Theodore H. Barrett commanded Federal troops on Brazos Island 12 miles to the east. The Confederates occupied Fort Brown 12 miles to the west, commanded by Gen. James E. Slaughter and Col. John S. (Rip) Ford, whose troops had captured Fort Brown from the Federals in 1864.

Ordered to recapture the fort, Lt. Col. David Branson and 300 men advanced from Brazos Island. They won a skirmish with Confederate pickets on May 12. Barrett reinforced Branson's troops with 200 men on May 13 and renewed the march to Fort Brown. Confederate cavalry held the Federals in check until Ford arrived with reinforcements that afternoon. Ford's artillery advanced and fired on the northern end of the Federal line while the cavalry charged. The Confederate right charged the southern end of the Federal line and captured part of the Union infantry. Barrett ordered a retreat toward the U.S. position on Brazos Island.

While the Confederates reported no fatalities in the Battle of Palmito Ranch, the
View from the Battle of Palmito Ranch Marker toward Port Isabel and South Padre Island image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 10, 2010
2. View from the Battle of Palmito Ranch Marker toward Port Isabel and South Padre Island
Click or scan to see
this page online
Union forces reported four officers and 111 men killed, wounded or missing.
 
Erected 1990 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 327.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the National Historic Landmarks series list. A significant historical date for this entry is May 12, 1864.
 
Location. 25° 57.692′ N, 97° 18.095′ W. Marker is in Boca Chica, Texas, in Cameron County. Marker can be reached from Boca Chica Boulevard (State Highway 4) 0.1 miles east of Palmito Hill Road, on the right when traveling east. Marker is approximately 12 miles east of Brownsville, Texas and about one mile north of the Rio Grande River. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Boca Chica Boulevard, Brownsville TX 78521, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Exploring The Boundaries (here, next to this marker); Palmito Ranch Battlefield: Last Clash of the Blue and the Gray (a few steps from this marker); Last Battle of the Civil War (approx. 0.2 miles away); Divided Loyalties: Hispanics in the Civil War (approx. 0.2 miles away); The High Price of Cotton (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Palmito Ranch
Battle of Palmito Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 10, 2010
3. Battle of Palmito Ranch Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Camp Belknap (approx. 4˝ miles away); Port of Brownsville (approx. 6.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Designated National Historic Landmark, 1997.
 
Also see . . .
1. Handbook of Texas History. (Submitted on September 3, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Battle of Palmito Ranch. (Submitted on September 4, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional commentary.
1.
The Confederate forces were helped in this one sided engagement by the loan of artillery pieces from the French army who were occupying Matamoros at that time. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted February 25, 2012, by Joseph P. Linck of Brownsville, Texas.

 
Additional keywords. 34th Indiana Veteran Infantry Regiment; 61st U.S. Colored Infantry; USCT; Trans-Mississippi Theater; John J. Williams.
 
Palmito Trees near marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 10, 2010
4. Palmito Trees near marker
Pvt. John J. Williams, 34th Indiana Regiment:<br> the last soldier to die in the American Civil War image. Click for full size.
5. Pvt. John J. Williams, 34th Indiana Regiment:
the last soldier to die in the American Civil War
- May 13, 1865, at the Battle of Palmito Ranch, Texas.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 15, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 3, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,159 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 3, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2, 3. submitted on September 4, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4. submitted on September 3, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5. submitted on September 4, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=35271

Paid Advertisement
May. 8, 2021