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Near Fredericksburg in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lee's Greatest Triumph

The Battle of Chancellorsville

— Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park —

 
 
Lee's Greatest Triumph Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
1. Lee's Greatest Triumph Marker
Inscription.  
As Union resistance around the Chancellor house dissolved, Robert E. Lee rode into the clearing behind his victorious battalions. Though badly outnumbered, Lee in three days had stopped the initial Union advance, brazenly split his own army to launch the most successful flank attack of the war, and, on May 3, driven the Federals from their entrenched positions around Chancellorsville. The battle was perhaps the greatest of his career.

Thousands of Confederate troops raised their hats and cheered when they saw Lee arrive near the Chancellor house. Wrote one staff officer:

...it must have been from such a scene that men in ancient days rose to the dignity of gods.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is May 1860.
 
Location. 38° 18.546′ N, 77° 38.089′ W. Marker is near Fredericksburg, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is on Plank Road / Germania Highway (State Highway 3) near Elys Ford Road
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(County Route 610), on the right when traveling west. Located at stop three of the driving tour of Chancellorsville Battlefield, the Chancellorsville Inn. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8840 Elys Ford Rd, Fredericksburg VA 22407, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Climactic Struggle (here, next to this marker); The Chancellor Slaves (within shouting distance of this marker); Civilians in the Crossfire (within shouting distance of this marker); Chancellorsville (within shouting distance of this marker); The Chancellorsville Intersection (within shouting distance of this marker); Chancellorsville Home of Mrs. Sanford Chancellor (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Chancellorsville (within shouting distance of this marker); Chancellorsville Clearing (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
More about this marker. The right side of the marker shows a depiction of Lee receiving the cheers of his army.
 
Regarding Lee's Greatest Triumph. This is one of several markers for the Battle of Chancellorsville at the Chancellorsville Intersection, scene of considerable fighting in the battle. See the Chancellorsville Intersection Virtual Tour by Markers in the links section for a listing of related
Markers Adjacent to the Artillery Displays image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
2. Markers Adjacent to the Artillery Displays
In the background is a portion of the clearing mentioned on the marker. It is not recorded where Lee initially stepped into the clearing.
markers on the tour.
 
Also see . . .  Chancellorsville Intersection Virtual Tour by Markers. The Chancellorsville Intersection portion of the battlefield (stop three on the driving tour of the battlefield) includes markers at the intersection of the historic Plank and Ely's Ford Roads. Considerable fighting occurred here on May 3, 1863. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Cannon at Chancellorsville Inn image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
3. Cannon at Chancellorsville Inn
The Parrott 3in Model 1864 Rifled Gun (front) and the 3in Ordnance Model 1861 Rifled Gun (rear) are examples of the most widely used rifled artillery pieces of the Civil War. The Parrott was named after its inventor, Robert Parker Parrott. Made of cast iron, cracking and bursting from metal fatigue was a concern. To reduce the risk, Parrott developed a technique to add a reinforcing band to the breech of the gun. As such the Parrott is among the easiest cannon of the period to identify.

In comparison, the Ordnance rifle used a wrought iron construction which alleviated the need for the reinforcing band. The distinctive "bottle" profile also offered smooth lines and few sharp angle stress points.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 2, 2023. It was originally submitted on November 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,685 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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May. 24, 2024