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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Pinos Altos in Grant County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Pinos Altos

 
 
Pinos Altos Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 6, 2010
1. Pinos Altos Marker
Inscription.  Once the seat of Grant County, Pinos Altos, survived conflicts with the Apache. A gold discovery in 1860 by three 49ers from California stimulated a boom that led to the establishment of this mining camp which produced over $8,000,000 of gold, silver, copper, lead and zinc before the mines played out in the 20th century.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceWars, US Indian.
 
Location. 32° 51.533′ N, 108° 13.367′ W. Marker is near Pinos Altos, New Mexico, in Grant County. Marker is on State Road 15 at milepost 6.2, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Pinos Altos NM 88053, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Silver City Cemetery (approx. 5˝ miles away); GFWC Silver City Women's Club (approx. 6 miles away); Fort Bayard (approx. 6.2 miles away); Silver City (approx. 6˝ miles away); Fort Bayard - 1866-1900 (approx. 6.7 miles away); Santa Rita Copper Mines
<i>back of</i> Pinos Altos Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 6, 2010
2. back of Pinos Altos Marker
(approx. 6.8 miles away); 1870's Log Cabin (approx. 6.9 miles away); Anita Scott Coleman (approx. 6.9 miles away).
 
Pinos Altos Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 6, 2010
3. Pinos Altos Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on November 20, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 701 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 20, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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Sep. 22, 2020