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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Munhall in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Homestead Strike

 
 
Homestead Strike Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Wintermantel, December 16, 2005
1. Homestead Strike Marker
Inscription.  On the morning of July 6, 1892, on orders of the Carnegie Steel Company, 300 Pinkerton agents attempted to land near here; strikers and citizens repulsed them. Seven workers and three Pinkertons were killed. 8,000 state militia arrived July 12; by November the strike was broken.
 
Erected 1992 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Government & PoliticsIndustry & CommerceLabor Unions. In addition, it is included in the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission series list. A significant historical date for this entry is July 6, 1706.
 
Location. 40° 24.774′ N, 79° 53.833′ W. Marker is in Munhall, Pennsylvania, in Allegheny County. Marker is on East Waterfront Drive, 0.7 miles west of E 8th Ave (Pennsylvania Route 837), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 880 East Waterfront Drive, Homestead PA 15120, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bost Building (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Bost Building (approx. half a mile away);
Homestead Strike Marker at Strike Site image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Wintermantel, March 13, 2011
2. Homestead Strike Marker at Strike Site
Click or scan to see
this page online
World War I Memorial (approx. half a mile away); Carnegie Library of Homestead Swim Team (approx. half a mile away); Carnegie Library of Homestead (approx. half a mile away); National Carpatho-Rusyn Cultural and Educational Center (approx. 0.6 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. Ύ mile away); a different marker also named World War I Memorial (approx. Ύ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Munhall.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Homestead Foundation. (Submitted on January 27, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia.)
2. Homestead Strike - Behind the Marker. (Submitted on July 7, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
The Homestead riot: the Pinkerton men leaving the barges after the surrender. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By W.P. Snyder, 1892
3. The Homestead riot: the Pinkerton men leaving the barges after the surrender.
Illus. in: Harper's weekly, v. 36, no. 1856 (1892 July 16), p. 673. Library 0f Congress [LC-USZ62-126046]
Homestead Strike Plaque image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Wintermantel, March 13, 2011
4. Homestead Strike Plaque
The Carnegie Steel Works image. Click for full size.
Photographed By E. Benjamin Andrews, 1912
5. The Carnegie Steel Works
Showing the shield used by the strikers when firing the cannon and watching the Pinkerton men, Homestead strike.
United States Steel Honor Sign image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Wintermantel, March 13, 2011
6. United States Steel Honor Sign
Homestead Works of Carnegie Steel Company image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dr. Statler, circa 1892
7. Homestead Works of Carnegie Steel Company
At the time of the 1892 strikes and riots in Homestead and Munhall.
Homestead Strike Advisory Board image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Unknown, 1892
8. Homestead Strike Advisory Board
Courtesy of the Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area
Burning Pinkerton barge on the Mongahela River image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Unknown, July 7, 1892
9. Burning Pinkerton barge on the Mongahela River
When 300 Pinkerton detectives attempted to land at the Homestead Works on July 7, 1892, striking steel workers defended the banks of the river in what became a day-long battle. Bombarded with explosives, cannons, and rifle fire, the detectives surrendered, after which strikers burned the barges and forced the Pinkertons to traverse a gauntlet of riotous workmen and their families, who kicked, punched, and howled invectives at the "band of cut-throats, thieves, and murderers." The Homestead affair further soiled the reputation of the Pinkertons. Shortly after battle at Homestead, twenty-six states outlawed their employment. Courtesy: Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 25, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,549 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 25, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on March 14, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on January 29, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   4. submitted on March 14, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   5. submitted on July 25, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   6. submitted on March 14, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   7. submitted on July 25, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   8, 9. submitted on July 26, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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May. 27, 2022