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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Dyckman Farmhouse Museum

Dyckman House Park

 

— .545 acre —

 
Dyckman Farmhouse Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 9, 2011
1. Dyckman Farmhouse Museum Marker
Inscription.  
Built by William Dyckman in approximately 1784, this house was once the center of a thriving farm more than 250 acres in size. Dyckman Farmhouse, along with the smokehouse and reconstructed “Hessian Hut,” has been a public museum since 1916.

Jan Dyckman arrived in New Amsterdam in the 1660s and began acquiring land in northern Manhattan. At the time of the American Revolution, Jan’s grandson William had inherited the Dyckman estate and the family homestead stood near present-day 210th Street and the Harlem River. During the British occupation of Manhattan (1776-83), William Dyckman and his wife Mary fled their home and sought refuge in upstate New York.

When the war ended, William returned to find his family’s home destroyed. It is believed that he immediately began building this new farmhouse, choosing a location further inland and on the newly re-routed Kingsbridge Road (now Broadway). The small two-story Dutch Colonial style home that William built served three generations of the Dyckman family. William’s son Jacobus took over in the 1790s, re-established the farm, and saw it prosper. After his death, Jacobus’
Dyckman Farmhouse and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 9, 2011
2. Dyckman Farmhouse and Marker
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two bachelor sons Isaac and Michael inherited the farmhouse. By the 1850s, Isaac, Michael and their nephew Isaac Michael Dyckman moved away, marking the end of Dyckman family residency here.

Following Isaac’s death in 1868, Isaac Michael inherited much of the property. The farmhouse left family ownership by the 1870s and served primarily as rental housing for the next several decades. By the early 20th century, the farmhouse was in disrepair and the rural character of the neighborhood was changing.

To ensure the farmhouse’s preservation, Mary Alice Dyckman Dean and Fannie Fredericka Welch, daughters of Isaac Michael, bought the property in 1915. With their husbands, curator Bashford Dean and architect Alexander McMillian Welch, they undertook a major restoration project to bring the farmhouse back to what they believed was its earliest appearance. They furnished the interiors and landscaped the property. Also, a reproduction smokehouse and reconstructed “Hessian Hut” were added to the site. The Dyckman Farmhouse Museum is owned by the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and is a member of the Historic House trust of New York City.
 
Erected 2010 by City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial Era
Dyckman Farmhouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 9, 2011
3. Dyckman Farmhouse
Notable BuildingsWar, US Revolutionary. A significant historical year for this entry is 1784.
 
Location. 40° 52.036′ N, 73° 55.38′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Broadway (U.S. 9) and 204th Street, on the left when traveling north on Broadway. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4881 Broadway, New York NY 10034, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Hessian Military Hut (within shouting distance of this marker); Shorakkopoch (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Tryon (approx. 0.6 miles away); Fort Tryon Park (approx. 0.7 miles away); Margaret Cochran Corbin (approx. 0.8 miles away); Colonel William Baxter (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Wading Place / Kings Bridge / Fort Prince Charles (approx. one mile away); Original King's Bridge (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Also see . . .  Dyckman Farmhouse Museum. Official NYC Parks description. (Submitted on April 8, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Rear of the Dyckman Farmhouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 9, 2011
4. Rear of the Dyckman Farmhouse
Dyckman Farmhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 9, 2011
5. Dyckman Farmhouse Marker
The
Dyckman House
Park
1783           1916
Smokehouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 9, 2011
6. Smokehouse
This reconstructed Smokehouse is located behind the Dyckman Farmhouse.
Hessian Hut image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 9, 2011
7. Hessian Hut
This structure represents dozens of its kind which were located in this area during the British occupation of Manhattan from 1776 through 1783.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 9, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 10, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 810 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 10, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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Jun. 15, 2021