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Albany in Albany County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Albany Pump Station

 
 
Albany Pump Station Historic Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 13, 2007
1. Albany Pump Station Historic Marker
Marker Mounted on the side of the building.
Inscription.  
The original Quackenbush pumping sta. engines pumped water from Hudson River to reservoirs until Dec. 1932. In Charge of Construction: I.C. Chesbrough. Engineer; J.H. Mars, Engineer For Pump Engine Constr.
1874

Designated as an Albany Historic Site by Common Council Jan. 15, 1981
 
Erected 1981.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Charity & Public WorkNatural ResourcesWaterways & Vessels. A significant historical date for this entry is January 15, 1903.
 
Location. 42° 39.245′ N, 73° 44.855′ W. Marker is in Albany, New York, in Albany County. Marker is on Montgomery Street (parking lot), on the right when traveling south. Marker is on the east side of the building, mounted on the wall to the left of the entrance. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Albany NY 12207, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lincoln Mourned (within shouting distance of this marker); Patroon Street (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Clinton Square (about 700 feet away); Herman Melville
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(about 800 feet away); First Church in Albany (Reformed) (about 800 feet away); Erie Canal (about 800 feet away); United Traction Company Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); B. Lodge & Company (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Albany.
 
Regarding Albany Pump Station. The Albany Pump Station consists of two adjoining buildings. The first building was completed in 1874, the entire structure being completed and put into service in 1895. Total floor space is 8,000 square feet and the roof trusses are 40 feet above the floor.

The Pump Station drew water from the Hudson River and pumped it under Clinton Avenue to Bleecker Reservoir, which is now Bleecker Stadium. In 1927 the pump station moved over 7 billion gallons of water. In 1932 the Alcove reservoir was put into service and the Pump Station ceased operation.

There are two, massive, overhead cranes which are still in place and operational today. These cranes, completed in 1906 and 1909 and used for pump engine repair, are each able to lift 20 tons. These cranes were used to install the fermentation and serving tanks in the brew pub establishment
Entrance to Albany Pump Station brew pub image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 13, 2007
2. Entrance to Albany Pump Station brew pub
The marker is to the left of the doors and mounted on the side of the building
now located in the building.
 
Albany Pump Station building image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 13, 2007
3. Albany Pump Station building
Old Albany Pump Station Photo image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 25, 2007
4. Old Albany Pump Station Photo
This photo appears inside the brew pub.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 13, 2007, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 4,356 times since then and 654 times this year. Last updated on December 14, 2007, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 13, 2007, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 15, 2024