Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Kanawha County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

State Capitol

 
 
State Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. State Capitol Marker
Inscription.  West Virginia's Capitol first located in Wheeling, 1863; located in Charleston, 1870; again in Wheeling, 1875, and finally in Charleston, 1885. It was located 2 mi. west until destroyed by fire, 1921. Present building was completed in 1932.
 
Erected 1965 by West Virginia Historic Commission.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Buildings. In addition, it is included in the West Virginia Archives and History series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1863.
 
Location. 38° 20.193′ N, 81° 36.966′ W. Marker is in Charleston, West Virginia, in Kanawha County. Marker is on Greenbrier Street (West Virginia Route 114) near Kanawha Blvd E (U.S. 60), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston WV 25311, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The 35th Star (within shouting distance of this marker); Executive Mansion (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 45th US Colored Infantry (about 500 feet away); Union Civil War Monument (about 700 feet away); Slavery in West Virginia
State Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
2. State Capitol Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
(about 800 feet away); Limestone • Sandstone • Silica (about 800 feet away); Coal (about 800 feet away); Oil (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Regarding State Capitol. Sectional differences in western and eastern Virginia fueled resentment and political divisions before the Civil War. The divisions soon became irrevocable after the convention in Richmond voted on April 17, 1861, for Virginia to secede and join the Confederacy. Far to the north of here, Wheeling,delegates of Virginia's western counties convened in June. They first reorganized and restored the loyal government of Virginia, and the then subsequently decided to create a new, loyal state from Virginia's western counties. In the midst of the conflict, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill creating West Virginia. On June 20, 1863, West Virginia became the only state born of the Civil War.

   Wheeling became the state capitol - but not for long. In 1870, the seat of government moved south to
Charleston after former Confederates regained the right to vote. Lawmakers, however, concidered Charleston isolated and provincial (with a population of only 3,162), so the capitol
State Capitol Marker, near Greenbrier Street and Kanawha Blvd E (US 60) intersection image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
3. State Capitol Marker, near Greenbrier Street and Kanawha Blvd E (US 60) intersection
returned to Wheeling, which had 19,280 residents. A statewide referendum eventually settled the issue, and Charleston became the permanent capitol in 1885.(West Virginia Civil War Trails)
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. the relationship, study marker shown.
 
State Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
4. State Capitol Marker
State Capitol's Golden Dome image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
5. State Capitol's Golden Dome
State Capitol with Lincoln Statue image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
6. State Capitol with Lincoln Statue
State Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
7. State Capitol
The act of Congress admitting
West Virginia to conditional
statehood was approved by
President Lincoln on December
31, 1862. The condition having
been completed with, on April
20, 1863. He proclaimed West
Virginia a state in the union
from and after sixty days from
that date, or June 20, 1863.
State Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
8. State Capitol
Here stands an American Elm sapling, an offspring of the lone "Survivor Tree" of the April 19,1995 Oklahoma City bombing of the federal building. It was presented to First Lady Gayle C. Manchin and the people of the State of West Virginia in 2006 by Oklahoma First Lady Kim Henry.
State Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, October 3, 2009
9. State Capitol
State Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, October 3, 2009
10. State Capitol
State Capitol , Executive Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
11. State Capitol , Executive Mansion
In 1924, ground was broken for this magnificent Georgian colonial style mansion, official home of the State's governors since 1926. Designed by W. F. Martens, it was constructed of colonial Harvard brick at an initial cost of $203,000.
State Capitol, Senator Robert C. Byrd image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
12. State Capitol, Senator Robert C. Byrd
State Capitol ,West Virginia Coalminer Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
13. State Capitol ,West Virginia Coalminer Memorial
State Capitol , Fallen Firefighters Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
14. State Capitol , Fallen Firefighters Memorial
State Capitol , Fallen Policemen Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
15. State Capitol , Fallen Policemen Memorial
State Capitol seen from I-64 / 77 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 19, 2011
16. State Capitol seen from I-64 / 77
State Capitol Zero Mile Stone image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
17. State Capitol Zero Mile Stone
State Road Commission of West Virginia; This stone was set on Capitol grounds in 1934 and removed in 1938 and reset in 1958 across the street along Kanawha Blvd E (U.S. 60)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 24, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 591 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on May 24, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   9, 10. submitted on October 5, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   11, 12, 13, 14, 15. submitted on May 25, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   16. submitted on May 24, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   17. submitted on February 12, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

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Jan. 28, 2022