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Huntington in Suffolk County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Kelsey Outrage 1873

 
 
Kelsey Outrage 1873 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
1. Kelsey Outrage 1873 Marker
Inscription.  Reputed barn where Charles G. Kelsey was tarred and feathered before being murdered by persons unknown.
 
Erected 1992 by Town of Huntington.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Events.
 
Location. 40° 52.34′ N, 73° 25.277′ W. Marker is in Huntington, New York, in Suffolk County. Marker is on Platt Place west of Spring Road, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Huntington NY 11743, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Earliest Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Thimble Factory (about 300 feet away); Old Burial Hill (about 800 feet away); Fort Golgotha (about 800 feet away); The Trade School Building (about 800 feet away); Sewing & Trade School (about 800 feet away); Iraq and Afghanistan Conflicts Memorial (about 800 feet away); Town of Huntington World War II Veterans Wall of Honor (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntington.
 
Also see . . .  Huntington's Horrible "Tar Town" Murder
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. (Submitted on May 29, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.)
 
Additional commentary.
1. Background on the Kelsey Outrage Affair
The marker refers to an incident involving a wealthy schoolteacher and poet named Charles G. Kelsey and his involvement with a young woman named Julia Smith, a former student. Since it was believed that the romance started when Julia was a student of Kelsey’s and because he was 10 years older than her, many in the community of Huntington objected to the relationship, especially Julia’s grandmother. On the night of November 4, 1872, Kelsey was returning from a late night political rally when he was ambushed by a group of masked men who stripped him before covering his body with tar and feathers and presenting him to Julia and her grandmother. Kelsey managed to escape his captors, but was never seen alive again. On August 29, 1873, fishermen discovered the lower half of Kelsey’s body in Cold Spring Harbor. The rest of his body was never found.

The incident split the town of Huntington into two camps: those who supported the ambush and those who condemned it. Julia Smith admitted to luring Kelsey into the ambush and later married a man suspected of taking part in it, but none of the masked men were ever
Marker in Huntington image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
2. Marker in Huntington
identified and this case was never solved.
    — Submitted May 29, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.
 
Kelsey Outrage 1873 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
3. Kelsey Outrage 1873 Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 24, 2020. It was originally submitted on May 29, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,278 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 29, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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Feb. 22, 2024