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Montell in Uvalde County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

General John R. Baylor

1822-1895

 
 
Home Town Confederate General John R. Baylor Monument/Marker image. Click for full size.
By Zacharias Beau T, May 29, 2011
1. Home Town Confederate General John R. Baylor Monument/Marker
Inscription.  
Home Town Confederate
General John R. Baylor
1822-1895
Born in Kentucky. Came to Texas Republic 1839. Colorful Indian fighter. In War against Cherokees 1840. Member Texas Legislature 1853. Comanche agent 1855-57. Delegate from Weatherford, Secession Convention. Commanding detachment of Second Regiment Texas Mounted Rifles occupied, took over supplies, Ft. Bliss. June 1861-- during campaign to extend Confederacy westward to the Pacific. Repulsed Federals, Mesilla, N. Mex., July 25. With 200 men took 700 Federals, their transports, arms, ammunition, 200 horses, 270 beeves, four cannon at

(Back):
San Augustin Springs, July 27. With Capitol at Mesilla, organized government, proclaimed Confederate control of Arizona, Aug. 1. Baylor became military, civil governor. Sent C.S.A. Treasury $9,500 captured at Ft. Fillmore. Supervised gold, silver mining for C.S.A. Order to kill instead of capture troublesome Apaches incensed authorities against him, had Baylor recalled to Texas, stripped of rank. As private "served guns in hottest of the fight" to recapture Galveston, Jan. 1, 1863. Salvaged U.S. warship parts
Home Town Confederate General John R. Baylor Monument/Marker image. Click for full size.
By Zacharias Beau T, May 29, 2011
2. Home Town Confederate General John R. Baylor Monument/Marker
Reverse side.
to make cannon light enough to go into battle on back of mule. 1863-63 in Confederate Congress. Given new command. Made Brigadier-General 1865. Raised, led troops in frontier defense. Fear of his moves pinned down thousands of Federals in California, Arizona. Climaxed war service on Northwest Texas border. Post-war lived in San Antonio. Farmed, ranched Uvalde County. Buried in Montell.
 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 2134.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 29° 32.413′ N, 100° 0.651′ W. Marker is in Montell, Texas, in Uvalde County. Marker is on State Highway 55 0.2 miles north of County Road 415, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Uvalde TX 78801, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of the Mission Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria (here, next to this marker); Near Site of Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria Mission (here, next to this marker); Church of the Ascension (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Montell Methodist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Charles A. Lindbergh in Texas (approx. 9 miles away); Site of Camp Wood (approx.
General John R. Baylor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, November 28, 2020
3. General John R. Baylor Marker
9½ miles away); Site of the Mission San Lorenzo De La Santa Cruz (approx. 9½ miles away); Chalk Bluff Indian Massacre (approx. 12 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montell.
 
More about this marker. Located across the road from Episcopal Church of the Ascension Cemetery, grave site of General Baylor.
 
Also see . . .  Baylor, John Robert (1822–1894) - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on December 4, 2020, by Brian Anderson of Atascocita, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 16, 2012, by Zacharias Beau T of Alpine, Texas. This page has been viewed 582 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 16, 2012, by Zacharias Beau T of Alpine, Texas.   3. submitted on December 4, 2020, by Brian Anderson of Atascocita, Texas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 24, 2021