Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Sanderson in Baker County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Camp at Sanderson

 
 
Camp at Sanderson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2012
1. Camp at Sanderson Marker
Inscription.  This site was used by both Union and Confederate soldiers as a camp during the campaign of 1864. The camp was used as a Confederate supply depot but it was abandoned on February 9, 1864. From the 9th to the 13th, it was held by Federals and used as a base for raids on Lake City and Gainesville. On February 20 the site was used by Federals attacking Olustee. In retreat from Olustee the camp again fell into Confederate hands.
 
Erected 1961 by Florida Board of Parks and Historic Memorials. (Marker Number F-18.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 30° 15.057′ N, 82° 16.157′ W. Marker is in Sanderson, Florida, in Baker County. Marker is on U.S. 90, on the right when traveling west. Located between Thomas Sweat Road and Pine Street (County Road 127). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sanderson FL 32087, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fight or Die (approx. 7˝ miles away); The Battle of Olustee (approx. 7.6 miles
Camp at Sanderson Restored Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, April 30, 2016
2. Camp at Sanderson Restored Marker
away); Battle of Ocean Pond (or The Battle of Olustee) (approx. 7.6 miles away); Brig. Gen. Joseph Finegan (approx. 7.6 miles away); The Yankees are Coming (approx. 7.6 miles away); Olustee Battlefield (approx. 7.6 miles away); The Battle Intensifies (approx. 7.6 miles away); A Legacy Remembered (approx. 7.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  The Battle of Olustee. ...The Federals advanced in three columns along the Lake City and Jacksonville Road, which ran roughly parallel to the Florida Atlantic and Gulf-Central Railroad. The Federal cavalry was in the vanguard, followed by the slower-moving infantry.... (Submitted on April 18, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. The Beginning of the End
The Confederate states began relying heavily on Florida's farmers to furnish beef, pork, beans, potatoes, and salt to sustain its military forces. The Union's attempt to restore Florida to the Union and to cut off these vital supplies, leads here on the afternoon of February 20, 1864, to the Battle of Olustee.
    — Submitted
Site of Camp at Sanderson and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2012
3. Site of Camp at Sanderson and Marker
April 18, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
 
Camp at Sanderson Marker, as seen looking west along US 90 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2012
4. Camp at Sanderson Marker, as seen looking west along US 90
Camp at Sanderson Marker, looking back east along US 90 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2012
5. Camp at Sanderson Marker, looking back east along US 90
Nearby Battle of Olustee Memorial erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2012
6. Nearby Battle of Olustee Memorial erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy
Camp at Sanderson Marker looking west towards I-10. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton
7. Camp at Sanderson Marker looking west towards I-10.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 7, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 18, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 939 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 18, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on May 2, 2016, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 18, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7. submitted on March 7, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 8, 2020