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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Rehoboth in Bristol County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Leonard Iron Mine

1696 - 1802

 
 
Leonard Iron Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Simmons, May 26, 2012
1. Leonard Iron Mine Marker
Inscription.  Nearby runs Mine Brook named after an iron mine established here in 1696 by the Leonards, a famous iron monger family from Norton and Taunton.

The ore dug at this site called bog iron, was found in the swamp and brook. The Leonards hauled the ore off in ox carts to their forge at Chartly village in Norton where it was rendered into iron products.

In 1720, when the town relocated Tremont Street, the Leonards were allowed to remove any ore found beneath the new road as long as the bridge and its causeway over the mine brook were not damaged.
 
Erected by Rehoboth Historical Commission.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 41° 54.138′ N, 71° 15.445′ W. Marker is in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, in Bristol County. Marker is on Tremont St, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rehoboth MA 02769, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cole-Perry Turning Mill (approx. one mile away); Indian Oven Rock

Leonard Iron Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Simmons, May 26, 2012
2. Leonard Iron Mine Marker
(approx. 1.7 miles away); LaSalette Seminary (approx. 1.9 miles away); Solomon Family Burial Ground (approx. 2˝ miles away); Last Wooden Bridge (approx. 2˝ miles away); Perryville Dam (approx. 2.7 miles away); Angell Park (approx. 2.9 miles away); Teixeira-Ruggio Square (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rehoboth.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on May 26, 2012, by Bryan Simmons of Attleboro, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 641 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 26, 2012, by Bryan Simmons of Attleboro, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Jul. 4, 2020