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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Army of Northern Virginia

General Robert E. Lee, Commanding

— September 14-16, 1862 —

 
 
Army of Northern Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
1. Army of Northern Virginia Marker
Inscription.  
Army of Northern Virginia was composed of Longstreet's and Jackson's Commands, Stuart's Cavalry Division and the Reserve Artillery.

D.R. Jones' and Hood's Division and Evans' Brigade of Longstreet's Command, also D.H. Hill's Division of Jackson's Command, were withdrawn from South Mountain during the night of September 14 and concentrated at Sharpsburg early next day, September 15. McLaws', R.H. Anderson's, and Walker's Division were detached from Longstreet's Command to assist Jackson in the investment of Harper's Ferry. Jackson's Command, having captured Harpers Ferry, reached Sharpsburg on September 16 and 17. Stuart's Cavalry and a part of the Reserve Artillery reached the field on the 15th and 16th. At nightfall of the 16th, Hood's Division, occupying a position in the East Woods and the fields between them and the Hagerstown Pike, in advance of the left of the Confederate line, encountered the advance of Meade's Division of Hooker's Corps, Army of the Potomac. The engagement ended at dark.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 301.)
 
Topics and series. This historical
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marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers series list. A significant historical date for this entry is September 14, 1862.
 
Location. 39° 28.174′ N, 77° 44.175′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Richardson Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Located at a tablet cluster near the Sunken Road next to the observation tower, stop eight on the driving tour of Antietam. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. September 17, 1862 (Continued) (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Army of Northern Virginia (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named September 17, 1862 (Continued) (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Army of Northern Virginia (here, next to this marker); September 17, 1862 (here, next to this marker); September 16, 1862 (a few steps from this marker); Army of the Potomac (a few steps from this marker); Hexamer's (New Jersey) Battery (a few steps from this marker); Major General Israel B. Richardson
Army of Northern Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Army of Northern Virginia Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Irish Brigade (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
More about this marker. One of three tablets erected at this location to describe the activities of the Army of Northern Virginia from September 15-17, 1862.
 
Also see . . .  Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on February 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Tablet Cluster next to the Observation Tower image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain
3. Tablet Cluster next to the Observation Tower
Army of Northern Virginia Marker<br>Third From the Right image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott
4. Army of Northern Virginia Marker
Third From the Right
General Robert E. Lee (1807-1870) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott
5. General Robert E. Lee (1807-1870)
In the bloodiest day of the war, with both sides suffering enormous losses, Lee withstood the Union assaults. He withdrew his battered army back to Virginia while President Abraham Lincoln used the Confederate reversal as an opportunity to announce the Emancipation Proclamation which put the Confederacy on the diplomatic and moral defensive, and would ultimately devastate the Confederacy's slave-based economy.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 1, 2022. It was originally submitted on February 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,118 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on September 27, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on February 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on September 27, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

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Feb. 28, 2024