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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Aylett in King William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Montville

 
 
Montville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 6, 2009
1. Montville Marker
Inscription.  This property was home of Philip Aylett (1791-1848), for whom the village is named and who served in both the Virginia House and Senate. His son, William Roane Aylett (1833-1900), who rose to colonel in the Confederate army and later served as commonwealth's attorney, also lived here. Until the early 20th century, two frame houses stood here side by side. The first incorporated an 1800 one-and-a-half story section with an 1830s two-story addition; this house was called Aylett's. The second house, the present Montville, dates to the mid-19th century and is a mirror image of the first, which burned in the early 1900s.
 
Erected 1997 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number O-59.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Government & PoliticsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 37° 46.307′ N, 77° 6.747′ W. Marker is in Aylett, Virginia, in King William County. Marker is on Richmond Tappahannock Highway (U.S. 360) 0.6 miles east of Mill Road, on
Montville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 6, 2009
2. Montville Marker
the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: King William VA 23086, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cavalry Raids (approx. 0.8 miles away); Rumford Academy (approx. 2.1 miles away); Sharon Indian School (approx. 2.6 miles away); Clark Home (approx. 4.1 miles away); Apple Tree Church (approx. 4.2 miles away); Pamunkey Indians In The Civil War (approx. 4.6 miles away); Headquarters of Opechancanough (approx. 4.6 miles away); Bruington Church (approx. 6.6 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Note the marker identifies the present Montville dates to the mid-19th century. However, the first structure was burned in 1908, meaning the second structure was built in the mid-20th century.
 
Regarding Montville. The comment that the "second structure was built in the mid 20th century" is incorrect. The two houses, mirror images of each other, were both built in the first half of the 19th century and stood side-by-side until the older half, the "Ayletts" house, burned in 1908. The "Montville" half predates the Civil War and stands today.
 
Also see . . .  L'Abeille de la Nouvelle D'Orleans. An article published in 1908 discusses why the first Montville was burned. Apparently, bats had infested the historic home and the only recourse was to destroy the colonial mansion. (Submitted on January 9, 2010.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Montville Marker Information
Richmond Tappahannock Highway (facing east) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 6, 2009
3. Richmond Tappahannock Highway (facing east)

The information at the end of the marker listed the original home burning in the early 1900's Should it be 1800's?
Editor's Note: Thank you for identifying the discrepancy on the marker. Research indicates the original home was burned in 1908, meaning the current mansion was built in the mid-20th century, not the mid-19th century as mentioned on the marker. While we cannot make a change to the marker, we can identify here the correct information.
    — Submitted January 8, 2010, by Ann Marie Hatchell of Richmond, Virginia.
 
Montville image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 6, 2009
4. Montville
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on December 8, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,164 times since then and 40 times this year. Last updated on July 22, 2012, by Gary L Young of Arlington, VA - Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 8, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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Sep. 18, 2020