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Romney in Hampshire County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Hampshire County Courthouse

Secession and Occupation

 
 
Hampshire County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, May 28, 2020
1. Hampshire County Courthouse Marker
Inscription.  On May 23, 1861, Virginians voted in a statewide referendum to approve or disapprove the Ordinance of Secession that the convention in Richmond had passed on April 17. Here at the Hampshire County Courthouse, 1,188 out of 2,635 eligible voters approved and 788 disapproved secession. Virginia seceded from the Union, and the Hampshire County Committee of Safety voted to raise $10,000 to support the Confederate war effort.

Although Hampshire County became part of the new state of West Virginia, county residents generally sided with the Confederacy during the war. On May 18, 1861, two local militia companies, the Hampshire Guards and the Frontier Riflemen, left Romney to join other Confederate units training at Harpers Ferry. During the course of the war, Hampshire County raised thirteen Confederate companies and only one for the Union. After the war, on September 26, 1867, Hampshire County dedicated what is perhaps the first Confederate Memorial in the United States. It still stands in Romney’s Indian Mound Cemetery.

Several times during the war, the troops of one side or the other occupied the Hampshire County Courthouse. As
Hampshire County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, May 28, 2020
2. Hampshire County Courthouse Marker
usual in such cases, the building suffered from rough treatment. Soldiers from both armies often found themselves searching for any type of structure that would provide protection from the weather. Camps were temporary, and the soldiers had only tents or crude cabins for shelter.
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails series list.
 
Location. 39° 20.52′ N, 78° 45.378′ W. Marker is in Romney, West Virginia, in Hampshire County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street (U.S. 50) and North High Street, on the right when traveling west on West Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Romney WV 26757, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Romney / Early Memorial (here, next to this marker); Romney in 1861–1865 / “Stonewall” Jackson (a few steps from this marker); Hampshire County World War I Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Gilbert Proctor Miller (a few steps from this marker); Old Literary Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Romney in Union Hands
Hampshire County Courthouse edifice image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 30, 2012
3. Hampshire County Courthouse edifice
(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Taggart-Hall House (about 400 feet away); Easton Family Homesite (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Romney.
 
Hampshire County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 30, 2012
4. Hampshire County Courthouse Marker
This is a previous iteration of the marker. The information is identical, although the formatting is slightly different.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 22, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 539 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 29, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3. submitted on August 29, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland.   4. submitted on August 22, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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Jun. 2, 2020